Course Descriptions

Each course’s abbreviation, number, title, description, prerequisites (if any), and credits are listed below.  Courses offered at the Bath Iron Works Shipyard as part of the Ship Design and Ship Production majors and at The Landing School as part of the Small Craft Design program are listed at the end of this section.

Course Abbreviations


BIOLOGY   (↑ Top ↑)

BI101 : General Biology I — An introductory course in modern biology covering the following topics: evolution and the diversification of life, including principles of taxonomy and diversity of form; function and structure of plants including transport, nutrition, sensory systems, reproduction, and defense; function and structure of animals including nutrition, digestion, gas exchange, circulation, excretion, chemical and electrical signals, reproduction, and the immune system; ecology, including behavior, population ecology, species interactions, community ecology, and ecosystems.
Rec. 3, Lab. 3, Cr. 4

BI102 : General Biology II — Introduction to the concepts and principles of modern biological thought with coverage of the following topics: the chemical basis of life including atoms, molecules, organic macromolecules, and cellular structure and function; cell division, including mitosis and meiosis; the fundamentals of Mendelian genetics, gene structure and expression, and current research in the field of genetics; developmental biology and cellular differentiation; evolutionary patterns and processes.
Prerequisite: BI101. Rec. 3, Lab 3, Cr. 4.

BI201 : Ecology — An introductory course in ecology. A study of the interactions of organisms with each other and with their abiotic environment. Topics include environmental factors, population ecology, community ecology, and ecosystem energetics. Emphasis is on illustration of basic principles using the local marine ecosystem.
Prerequisite: BI102. Rec. 3, Lab. 3, Cr. 4.

BI210 : Marine Zoology — An overview of animal biology in the marine environment. Physiology, behavior, ecology, and evolution of marine unicellular and multicellular animals will be presented. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on the diversity and habitats of marine animals in the Gulf of Maine region. Prerequisite: BI102. Rec. 3, Lab. 3, Cr. 4.

BI218 : Animal Behavior — The evolution and ecology of animal behavior is explored in detail. The evolution and diversity, as well as the ecological consequences, of behavior will be studied. Topics include the genetics and physiology of behavior, perceptual systems, integration and storage of information, ecology of reproduction, feeding behavior, habitat selection and migration, and social behavior.
Prerequisite: BI102. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BI220 : Marine Botany — An introduction to the taxonomic, physiological, chemical, and ecological aspects of marine photosynthesizers. Topics covered include: marine plant environments, physiological ecology, the influence of anthropogenic effects on marine photosynthesizers, as well as an examination of microalgae, seaweeds, salt marsh plants, and sea grasses. Laboratory emphasis is on a survey of marine flora and habitats found in the Gulf of Maine.
Prerequisite: BI102. Rec. 3, Lab 3, Cr. 4.

BI301 : Marine Organism Physiology — Physiology examines the processes of cells, tissues, and organ systems. This course is designed to allow an understanding of how physiological processes relate to how organisms function in their environment. We will utilize three primary approaches: (1) structure/function studies examining how the morphology of a system relates to function, (2) comparative discussions contrasting the mechanisms by which marine plants and animals are adapted to life in the marine environment, and (3) evolutionary comparisons of how different organ systems have evolved within and throughout marine taxa.
Prerequisite: BI102. Rec. 3, Lab 3, Cr. 4.

BI306 : Ichthyology — An introductory course in the biology of fishes. Topics include: anatomy and physiology, ecology, evolution and behavior of fishes, classification of fishes, and the conservation and management of fish and fisheries.
Prerequisites: BI210 or BI220. Rec. 3, Lab. 3, Cr. 4.

BI308 : Cell Biology — This course is an overview of the fundamental structure and function of biomolecules and organelles of the plant and animal cell. Cell structure and function topics include membrane phenomena, cytoskeleton, gene expression (replication, transcription, translation), protein sorting and function, secretory pathways, signal transduction, and cell cycle. Additional areas include energy production and utilization, cellular biosynthesis, and control of cellular activities. Prerequisites: BI102 and CH310. Rec. 3, Lab. 3, Cr. 4.

BI312 : Genetics — This course is an introduction to genetics from the molecular to the population level. The course covers concepts of classical Mendelian genetics, prokaryote genetics, maintenance of variability, gene interactions, and modern genomics. Genetics in ecological and evolutionary settings will be emphasized. Modern genetic techniques and technologies will be described as well.
Prerequisites: BI102 and CH310. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BI321 : Biology of Symbiosis — Symbiosis is the interaction between two or more different types of organisms in an ecological setting. Interactions such as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, and predation occur at the cellular, organismal, and community levels. Relevant marine, aquatic, and terrestrial examples of symbiotic relationships will be investigated and discussed in order to appreciate the biological and evolutionary significance of these remarkable associations.
Prerequisites: BI201 and BI301. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BI323 : Biogeography — A course examining the distribution of organisms on Earth. Topics covered will include global and regional biogeographic patterns, early Earth and fundamental biogeographic processes, phylogeography, ecological biogeography, and conservation biogeography. This course will also explore current biogeography topics by discussing papers from primary literature.
Prerequisites: BI201. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BI499 : Special Topics in Biology — A course allowing students to pursue instruction not normally offered in the curriculum, through any combination of lecture and laboratory. Departmental approval required. Prerequisite: MS101. Cr. 1-3 as appropriate.

CADET SHIPPING – DECK   (↑ Top ↑)

CD203 : Cadet Shipping Deck — A cooperative experience in the merchant marine in which the student is normally assigned a billet aboard a commercial merchant ship by the director of cadet shipping. (In some cases this cruise may be accomplished aboard the T.S. State of Maine.) The student participates in the operation of the ship as a cadet mate applying classroom lessons of the first two years. An extensive written sea project detailing all aspects of the experience is required.
Prerequisites: students must not be on academic probation and must have passed CR103, NS122, NS241, NS262, NS282, NS292, MT21D or Department Chair approval. Basic Safety Training and drug-free certification are also required. Cr. 4.

CD303 : Junior Cruise Deck — The final cruise in a series of three. A thorough shipboard experience designed to prepare the student to understand fully the systems and operating procedures necessary for the execution of the responsibilities of a third mate. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements.
Prerequisites: CD203, NS221, NS301, NS332, NS345, NS381, MT32D or Department Chair approval. Cr. 4.

CADET SHIPPING ENGINEERING   (↑ Top ↑)

CE203 : Cadet Shipping Engine — A cooperative experience in the merchant marine in which the student is normally assigned a billet aboard a commercial merchant ship by the director of cadet shipping. (In some cases this cruise may be accomplished aboard the T.S. State of Maine.) The student participates in the operation of the ship as a cadet engineer applying classroom lessons of the first two years. An extensive written sea project detailing all aspects of the experience is required.
Prerequisites: students must not be on academic probation and must have passed CR103, ET201 or ES201, EG234, EG252, EG261 or EG265, ET371 or ES371, and EG292 or have a minimum of C- grade in each at the end of the 10th week of the current semester, or obtain permission of the Engineering Cadet Shipping Coordinator. Basic Safety Training and drug-free certification are also required.
Cr. 4.

CE303 : Junior Cruise Engine — The final cruise in a series of three. A thorough shipboard experience designed to prepare the student to understand fully the systems and operating procedures necessary for the execution of the responsibilities of a third engineer. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisites: CE203 with a grade of C- or higher, EG372, ET211 or ES251 or ES201; Satisfactory participation in the ship’s Familiarization/Orientation Program, Maintenance Second Class, or approval by the Training Committee on Exceptional cases. Cr. 4.

CHEMISTRY   (↑ Top ↑)

CH210 : Chemistry I — An introduction to the nature and properties of matter at the atomic and molecular level; chemical changes; stoichiometry; energy changes; structure and periodicity of elements; states of matter, chemical bonding, and kinetics. Rec. 3, Lab. 3, Cr. 4.

CH220 : Chemistry II — A second course in chemistry dealing with equilibria of acids and bases; simple thermodynamics; electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry; metals and non-metals; and brief introduction to organic and biochemistry. Prerequisite: CH210. Rec. 3, Lab. 3, Cr. 4.

CH301 : Chemical Principles — This course examines basic concepts of general chemistry, including: stoichiometry, atomic structure, periodic properties, chemical bonding, states and properties of matter, equilibria, acids and bases, and properties of organic compounds. Rec. 3, Lab. 3, Cr. 4.

CH310 : Introduction to Organic Chemistry — An introduction to general organic chemistry with an emphasis on natural aspects of the topic. Areas of concentration will include: organic nomenclature, structural theory and stereochemistry of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, and chemical reactions of fundamental importance to organic chemistry. The laboratory will present a survey of analytic methods commonly employed in organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CH220. Rec. 3, Lab. 3, Cr. 4.

CH352 : Engineering Chemistry — Atomic and molecular structure, bonding types and energies, stoichiometric computations, solutions, equilibria, oxidation-reduction, nuclear and organic chemistry. Rec. 3, Lab. 3, Cr. 4.

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION   (↑ Top ↑)

CO200 : Cooperative Industrial Field Exp I — A full-time work experience for power engineering technology students, normally with wage compensation, in shoreside industrial and utility power plants. The work experience must be related, in both theoretical and practical engineering, to the student’s field of study in basic power engineering operations and maintenance. A minimum of ten full weeks or the equivalent at the discretion of the instructor, of employment is required to be eligible for credit in this course. Note: The combined satisfactory employment hours of CO200 and CO300, however, must total 1050 hours or more in a steam facility for the student to be eligible for the State of Maine Third Class Engineer (Stationary Plant) license. The course grade will be based on an extensive written project documenting this work experience. When registering for this course, the student must be in good academic standing. Students in a probation or warning status will not be eligible to participate in this course. Prerequisites: EG234, EG243, EG261, ET101, ET211, ET371, ET452, and drug free certification required. Cr. 2.

CO201 : PEO Cooperative Industrial Fld Exp I — A full-time work experience for power engineering operations students, normally with wage compensation, in shoreside, steam powered, industrial and utility power plants. The work experience must be related in both theoretical and practical engineering, to the student’s field of study in basic power engineering operations and maintenance. A minimum of twelve full weeks or the equivalent at the discretion of the instructor, of employment is required to be eligible for credit in this course. Note: The combined satisfactory employment hours of CO201 and CO301, however, must total 1050 hours or more in a steam facility for the student to be eligible for the State of Maine Fourth Class Engineer (Stationary Plant) license. The course grade will be based on an extensive written project documenting this work experience. When registering for this course, the student must be in good academic standing. Students in a probation or warning status will not be eligible to participate in this course. Prerequisites: EG234, EG243, EG261, ET101, ET211, ET371, ET452, and drug free certification required. Cr. 2.

CO203 : Cooperative Experience Eng I — A full-time work experience for Marine Systems Engineering (non-license track) students, normally for wage compensation, in a real-world engineering environment. Credit will be awarded at ¼ credit for each two weeks of satisfactory work, with a minimum of 1.5 credits required to earn credit for the course. Requirements include a daily work-activity journal (unless prohibited by documented national or company security concerns), a brief completion report, and a weekly e-mail report sent to the MSE Co-op Coordinator. Prerequisites: Student must have successfully completed the first two years of the MSE program, be in good academic standing and not be on academic warning or probation, and drug free certification required. Cr. 1.5 to 4.0.

CO223 : SVO/VOT Cooperative Work Exp I — A minimum of 60 days of supervised work experience aboard an appropriate vessel. This cooperative work experience is intended to provide the student with an entry level deck position for training and sea service days toward a USCG 200 GT Mate/Near Coastal license. Students are encouraged to pursue vessel opportunities aligned with their particular interests. An extensive written sea project is required. (A total of 120 qualifying sea service days are required for the USCG 200 GT Mate/Near Coastal license). Prerequisite: HC111, NS101, NS103, PE114, NS132, NS135, NS241, USCG1 and USCG2 or approval of the SVO/VOT coordinator and drug free certification required; pass the USCG Lifeboatman Exam. Cr. 3.

CO300 : Cooperative Industrial Field Exp II — The second in a series of full-time work experiences for power engineering technology students, normally with wage compensation, in shoreside industrial and utility power plants. A continuation of CO200 with emphasis on advanced power engineering operations, maintenance, organization, and management. A minimum of ten full weeks or the equivalent at the discretion of the instructor, of employment is required to be eligible for credit in this course. Note: The combined satisfactory employment hours of CO200 and CO300, however, must total 1050 hours or more in a steam facility for the student to be eligible for the State of Maine Third Class Engineer (Stationary Plant) license. The course grade will be based on an extensive written project documenting this work experience. When registering for this course, the student must be in good academic standing. Students in a probation or warning status are not eligible to participate in this course. Prerequisites: CO200, EG382, EG431, ET212, ET378, ET432, and drug free certification required. Cr. 2.

CO301 : PEO Coop Industrial Field Exp II — The second in a series of full-time work experiences for power engineering operations students, normally with wage compensation, in shoreside, steam powered, industrial and utility power plants. A continuation of CO201 with emphasis on advanced power engineering operations, maintenance, organization, and management. A minimum of twelve full weeks or the equivalent at the discretion of the instructor, of employment is required to be eligible for credit in this course. Note: The combined satisfactory employment hours of CO201 and CO301, however, must total 1050 hours or more in a steam facility for the student to be eligible for the State of Maine Fourth Class Engineer (Stationary Plant) license. The course grade will be based on an extensive written project documenting this work experience. When registering for this course, you must be in good academic standing. Students in a probation or warning status are not eligible to participate in this course. Prerequisites: CO201, EG321, EG372, EG382, EG431, and drug free certification required. Cr. 2.

CO311 : Ocean Studies Cooperative Exp — A maximum of three credits will be offered for a directed cooperative education experience: students must submit a proposal for evaluation and approval of the Ocean Studies faculty at which time credits will be assigned; the final grade to be based on a cooperative education project report to be submitted by the student upon completion of the Co-op experience. Prerequisite: drug free certification required. Cr. 1-3.

CO323 : VOT Cooperative Work Exp II — A minimum of 60 days of supervised work experience aboard an appropriate vessel greater than 50 gross tons. This cooperative work experience is intended to provide the student with a more advanced deck position, with increased responsibilities, for training and sea service toward a USCG 500 GT Mate/Near Coastal/Oceans license. Students are encouraged to pursue vessel opportunities aligned with their particular interests. An extensive written sea project is required. (A total of 240 qualifying sea service days are required to the USCG 50 GT Mate/Near Coastal/Oceans license). Prerequisite: CO223, NS271, NS272, NS262, NS292 or approval of the VOT coordinator and drug free certification required. Cr. 3.

CO400 : Cooperative Industrial Field Exp — A period of work experience, normally full-time and paid, with private industry or government in a job related to the student’s degree program and/or career goals and which differs significantly from previous experiences. Normally, credit will be awarded at the rate of 0.25 credits for each two weeks of full-time work experience. No student may earn more than four credits in this course during his/her enrollment at the Academy and these credits cannot be substituted for any other degree or minor program requirements. Prerequisite: MSE program coordinator’s approval and drug free certification required. Cr. 0.5 to 4.0. (Students in Marine Systems Engineering are required to successfully complete 1.5 credits of this course.)

CO410 : Maritime Transp Coop Field Exp — A period of work experience, normally full-time and paid, with private industry or government in a job related to the student’s degree program and/or career goals and which differs significantly from previous experiences. Normally, credit will be awarded at the rate of one-half credit for each two weeks of full-time work experience. Grading will be on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. No student may earn more than four credits in cooperative education during his/her enrollment at the Academy and these credits cannot be substituted for any other degree or minor program requirements. Prerequisite: Department Chair approval and drug free certification required. Cr. 0.5 to 4.

CO423 : VOT Work Experience III — A minimum of 60 days of supervised work experience aboard an appropriate vessel greater than 50 gross tons. This cooperative work experience is intended to provide the student with a more advanced deck position, with increased responsibilities, for training and sea service toward a USCG 500 GT Mate/Near Coastal/Oceans license. Students are encouraged to pursue vessel opportunities aligned with their particular interests. An extensive written sea project is required. (A total of 240 qualifying sea service days are required to the USCG 50 GT Mate/Near Coastal/Oceans license). Prerequisite: CO323 or approval of the VOT coordinator and drug free certification required. Cr. 3.

CRUISE   (↑ Top ↑)

CR103 : First Year Cruise — Introduction to the shipboard responsibilities of deck and engineering officers. Orientation and practical experience in watch standing and ship maintenance procedures; an overview of ship systems designed to assist the student in the selection of a major field of study in marine transportation or engineering. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisites for all majors include: EG101, NS101, PE114, participation in the Regiment; completion of the ship’s Familiarization/Orientation Program; first year maintenance; fire training; pass the USCG Lifeboatman Exam. Cr. 4.

CR214 : Auxiliary Sail Training Cruise — This two-month training cruise will introduce the Auxiliary Sail License Candidate to the preparation and operation of a large, traditional sailing vessel. One month will be spent fitting out the schooner Bowdoin (and other vessels) for the sailing season, and one month will be spent sailing. The itinerary will include both coastwise and offshore sailing. Cr. 4.

CR313 : VOT Training Cruise — A two week training cruise for fourth year students that encompasses advanced practical training and STCW assessment. This is both a coastwise and offshore passage incorporating terrestrial and celestial navigation, watchkeeping, vessel handling, emergency operations, passage planning and the entering and clearing of foreign ports. The schooner Bowdoin is used for this course so the student is also exposed to sailing a traditionally rigged auxiliary sail vessel. Prerequisites: NS101, NS241, NS262, NS271, NS272, NS282, NS292, NS381. Cr. 2.

COMPUTER SCIENCE   (↑ Top ↑)

CS150 : Structured Problem Solving with Computer — A course in problem solving using computers and emphasizing a structured approach. Topics include: structured solution methods, programming fundamentals, spreadsheet modeling, and an introduction to presentation software. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

CS151 : Introduction to Engineering Programming — An introductory level course in computer programming and applications. This course introduces engineering students to basic structured programming and engineering mathematical software. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

CS220 : C/C++ Programming — An intermediate course in computer programming, using C/C++. Prerequisite: CS150. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

CS331 : Special Topics Computer Science — A course allowing students to pursue various topics in Computer Science. Rec. 3, Cr. 3

ECONOMICS   (↑ Top ↑)

EC102 : Microeconomics — Introduction to supply and demand, markets, externalities and public goods, the theory of the firm, industrial organization and game theory, and factor markets. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

EC103 : Macroeconomics — Introduction to national income accounting, business cycles, and inflation. Topics also include money and banking, monetary and fiscal policy. Rec. 3, Cr. 3

ENGINEERING OPERATIONS   (↑ Top ↑)

EG101 : Fundamentals of Engineering Operations — A study of basic mechanical power generation systems, with emphasis on the applicable technologies and their safe and efficient management. The course is designed to introduce both engineering and non-engineering students to operating engineering. The course provides a foundation for many engineering department courses. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 3, Cr. 2.

EG234 : Power Equipment Lab — An introduction to marine and stationary power plant systems and equipment through study, inspection, and maintenance applications. Topics include lubrication and lube oil purification systems; pumps; air removal equipment; and heat exchangers; piping systems and valves; control systems for temperature, pressure, and flow; compressed air systems; distilling plants; and auxiliary steam turbines. In addition, basic equipment techniques and tag-out safety procedures are introduced. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisite: EG101. Lab. 3, Cr. 2.

EG242 : Machine Tool Practices — An introductory course in machine tool practices for Power Engineering Technology students. This course is designed to give students the basic theory and practical application necessary to work with and supervise the operation of machine tools and associated equipment such as engine lathe, milling machine, drill press and precision measuring and layout tools. PET students may take EG252 in place of this course and also apply EG252 toward the PET Free Elective requirement. Rec. 1, Lab. 0, Cr. 1.

EG243 : Welding — An introduction to and practice in the principles, safety aspects, and correct operations of arc welding and oxyacetylene cutting. Emphasis is on all-position shielded metal arc welding. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 1, Lab 2, Cr. 2.

EG252 : Machine Tool Operations I — An introductory course in machine tool practices. This course is designed to give students the basic theory and practical application necessary to operate machine tools and associated equipment such as engine lathe, milling machine, drill press, precision measuring and layout tools. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 1, Lab. 3, Cr. 2 .5.

EG261 : Steam Generators I — The construction and design of marine boilers of all types, including fuel oil systems and equipment, feedwater analysis, furnace refractories, and U. S. Coast Guard construction regulations. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisite: EG101. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

EG265 : Steam Generating Systems — A condensed version of EG261 (Steam Generators I) with more emphasis on principles of design, automation, and operation and less emphasis on construction details. Prerequisite: Marine Systems Engineering Major or consent of instructor. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisite: EG101. Rec. 2, Cr. 2.

EG292 : Diesel Power I — Introductory study of diesel engine principles, covering typical construction features with pertinent systems including fuel, lubricating, cooling, starting and maneuvering, exhaust and heat recovery. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

EG321 : Steam Turbines I — A study of the elementary principles, descriptive classifications, and construction and accessories of various types of marine, stationary, and auxiliary turbines. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisite: ET211 or ES251 or ES201. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

EG350 : Intro to Envrtl Regs&Ethical Indtl Compl — This course is designed to develop each student’s ability to recognize and effectively deal with compliance issues and professional ethics associated with environmental permitting procedures. The course will include an introduction to environmental science with a focus on defining standards pertaining to all aspects of pollutants, emissions, control technology, and enforcement. The course will consist of three primary areas: air quality, water quality including ballast water, and hazardous waste. Prerequisites: CH301. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

EG351 : Machine Tool Operations II — Practical study of the operation and utilization of lathes and milling machines. Provides a continuing opportunity to receive actual practice in threading and milling projects. Prerequisite: EG252. Rec. 1, Lab 3, Cr. 2.5.

EG352 : Machine Tool Operations III — Designed to give the machine tool student experience in developing advanced machining skills. Training includes internal single point threading and boring; knurling, radius and taper turning on the lathe; and advanced milling machine operations using traditional machining methods. Computer numerical controlled programming and machining will be introduced. Traditional machining and computer numerical control (CNC) machining projects are required. Prerequisite: EG351 or permission of instructor. Rec. 1, Lab 2, Cr. 2.

EG372 : Electrical Power II — Builds on ET/ES371 to develop an understanding of design, construction, operational characteristics, efficiency and maintenance of DC and single- and 3-phase AC machinery, and pulse-width modulation (PWM) and its applications to propulsion and industrial drives. Lab work will emphasize principles of safe and efficient operation, troubleshooting, and installation of electrical machinery and systematic use of measuring equipment. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisites: MS110 or MS150, ET371 or ES371, PS102 or PS162, CE203 or CO200 or CO201. Rec. 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3.

EG382 : Steam Power Systems I — A study of measurement and adjustment techniques, and of control systems on modern main and auxiliary steam turbines. Includes lubrication systems, main propulsion shafting and propellers, and maintenance and emergency repairs of main propulsion turbines. The operation and maintenance of all types of marine boilers and their associated equipment along with U.S. Coast Guard operating regulations are covered. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisites: EG265 or EG261, EG321. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

EG392 : Diesel Power II — Continuation of material from EG292, with emphasis on theory and operation of air intake systems, fuel injection systems, governors, and lubrication systems. Characteristics of available lubricants and factors affecting lubrication and combustion are covered in detail. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisite: EG292 or NS132. Rec. 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3.

EG400 : Special Topics in Engineering Operations — An upper-level course in engineering operations and related topics. Topics to be determined based on student or faculty proposals. Prerequisites to be determined based on course level and content or approval of department chair and instructor. Cr. 1-3.

EG422 : Steam Power Systems II — Covers operations, testing, and components of steam power plants through lectures and laboratories that include work with a steam plant simulator and an operating steam plant. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisites: EG382, and ET371 or ES371. Rec. 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3.

EG431 : Gas Turbines — The design, operation, and maintenance of marine and industrial gas turbines and their systems. Prerequisites: ET211 and EG321. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

EG442 : Advanced Welding — The theory and practice of specialized types of welding such as tungsten inert gas, aluminum, and pipe welding. Includes specialized fabrication problems encountered aboard ship. Prerequisite: EG243. Lab. 3, Cr. 1.

EG481 : Marine Refrigeration & Air Conditioning — Refrigeration processes encountered in the marine field and industry. Includes the design, operation, and maintenance of the principal refrigeration cycle components, reciprocating and rotary centrifugal compressors, and the refrigerants used. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisite: ET211 or ES201 Rec. 2, Lab. 1, Cr. 2.5.

EG491 : Diesel Power III — A review of marine diesel engines of all types including the design, operation and maintenance, indicator card analysis, and emergency repair of large diesel engines. Prerequisite: EG392. Rec. 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3.

EG492 : Diesel Power III (No Lab) — A review of marine diesel engines of all types including the design, operation and maintenance, indicator card analysis, and emergency repair of large diesel engines. Prerequisite: EG392. Rec. 2, Cr. 2.

EG497 : Power Engineering Operations Capstone I — The course will introduce concepts of power plant operations, which build on previous PEO curriculum material. This will include fossil power plant operations and technologies, electrical grid operation and current topics of interest in the power generation industry. This course is a communications intensive course. Prerequisites: EG382 and EG431. Rec. 3, Lab. 2, Cr. 4.

EG498 : Power Engineering Operations Capstone II — The course will develop concepts of power plant operations, which build on previous PEO curriculum material. This will include combined cycle power plant operations and technologies, environmental considerations, professional ethics and current topics of interest in the power generation industry. This course is a communications intensive course. Prerequisite: EG497. Rec. 3, Lab. 2, Cr. 4.

ENVIRONMENTAL   (↑ Top ↑)

EN201 : Understanding Climate Change — This interdisciplinary course investigates the interaction of major factors that influence global climate. Students will examine evidence that supports and refutes climate change due to human activity and related effects on the biosphere. The course also addresses strategies to minimize or adapt to changes in climate and their affects on global physical, social, and biological landscapes. Content relevant to each student’s major is included. Rec. 3, Cr. 3

EN202 : Introduction to Sustainability — This introductory course will examine the effects of our actions in the areas of business, engineering, science and transportation as they relate to our marine and terrestrial environment. Students will consider pollutant sources and effects, mitigation affects, regulatory and ethical behavior, environmental health and safety, and financial considerations. At the completion of this course students will have a fundamental understanding of environmental issues and responsibilities as they relate to degree programs at MMA. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

EN232 : Pollution Control & Remediation — This course provides an introduction to pollution control (regulations and environmental effects), wastewater treatment, oil spill containment, spill response, recover and beach/soil remediation, on-shore spill response and sail remediation, and process control specifically (but not exclusively) related to marine transportation and power plants. Course will include related environmental health and safety component. Course will include hands-on lab components for sample testing, site monitoring, site visits and coordinate with local facilities and State or Federal regulators. Prerequisite: EN202. Rec. 2, lab. 2, Cr. 3.

EN402 : Biofuels: Production and Use — This course will focus on the development, production and use of 1st and 2nd generation biofuels including biomass, alcohol, biodiesel, biogas and engineered specialty fuels like biojet and biocrude. An overview of the field provides the rationale for biofuels as part of the energy sector. The basic chemistry and energetics of combustion, fermentation and other relevant reactions are considered fundamental to understanding how fuel creates energy, and the subtle differences between fuels that make them more or less valuable. Economic, regulatory, social and environmental considerations will make up a significant percentage of the course content. Prerequisites: EN202 and CH301 or CH352 or CH210. Rec. 2, Lab. 3, Cr. 3.

EN420 : Air Pollution & Emissions Testing & Cont — This course will include an introduction to air pollution regulations, emissions testing, the science of emissions and reduction in emissions through process control and mechanical optimization, air pollution control techniques specifically (but not exclusively) related to marine transportation and power plants. This course will also include a related environmental health and safety component. This course will include hands-on lab components for sample testing and site monitoring. Prerequisites: EN202 and CH210 or CH301 or CH352. Rec. 2. Lab. 2, Cr. 3.

ENGINEERING   (↑ Top ↑)

ES180 : Engineering Design I — A first course in “structured” conceptual design of engineering systems. Lectures emphasize methods of creating alternate approaches to solve a given “open ended” engineering problem, and identifying the most promising solutions. This communications intensive course includes a conceptual design project and simple computer application. Students will work in design teams devising, evaluating, and defending a feasible solution to a design problem. Prerequisite: CS150 or taken concurrently. Rec. 2, Cr. 2.

ES201 : Introduction to Thermal Fluid Science — This course provides an introduction to fluid dynamics and thermodynamics including the properties of pure substances, gas laws, first and second laws of thermodynamics. Topics include hydrostatics, conservation of mass and energy, introduction to the second law of thermodynamics and basic heat transfer. Practical problems in hydrostatics, pipe flows and losses, pump sizing, heat transfer and thermal analysis of heat devices including engines and heat exchangers will be part of the course. Computer problem will also be assigned. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisites: CS151, MS110 or MS150, PS102 or PS 162, ET201 Lab concurrent or permission of the instructor. Rec 4 Lab 2, Cr. 5

ES205 : Engineering Statics — The study of forces applied to structures. Includes an introduction to vector mechanics, static equilibrium, two and three-dimensional force systems, distributed forces, and friction. Structures studied include trusses, frames, and beams. Prerequisites: MS110 or MS150 and PS102 or PS162. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ES235 : Engineering Strength of Materials — A study of stresses and strains in structures due to tension, compression, shear, torsion, bending, and combined stresses. Stress transformation and introduction to three-dimensional stresses. Applications include beams, columns, and indeterminate structures. Prerequisite: ES205. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ES245 : Engineering Fluid Mechanics — An engineering-level extension to ET201 Fluid Power. Topics include fluid statics and dynamics as applied to ship stability, series and parallel pipe flow, open channel flow, and inviscid flow around solid objects. Application of curve fits and dimensional analysis to experiment design and data reduction. Prerequisites: ET201 or ES201, ES205, MS252. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ES251 : Engineering Thermodynamics I — Introduction to thermodynamic properties, phases, and processes and the concepts of energy, work, and heat. The First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics are developed. Entropy and availability are developed through Second Law analysis. Computer application and problem solving are emphasized and design and open-ended problems are presented as design experiences. Prerequisites: MS110 or MS150, PS102 or PS162, and CS150. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ES352 : Engineering Thermodynamics II — Engineering applications of the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics, entropy and availability to the following topics: analysis of power and refrigeration cycles, gas mixtures, psychometrics and flow through nozzles, and blade passages, and combustion processes. Heat transfer principles are introduced. Engineering design and computer applications are emphasized. Prerequisites: ES201, MS120 or MS160, and PS201 or PS261. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ES371 : Enhanced Electrical Power I — An expanded version of ET371, for students planning to take the Engineering-in-Training (EIT) examination. Includes additional topics in AC and DC circuit theory, transient analysis in DC circuits, Norton’s and Thevenin’s Theorems, loop current and node voltage analysis, and complex notation analysis of AC circuits. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisites: PS201 or PS261, MS110 or MS150. Rec. 3, Lab. 2, Cr. 4.

ES380 : Engineering Design II — A second course in engineering design, utilizing applied probability and statistics for design evaluation and improvement. Topics may include control charts, measurements, analysis of variance, statistically designed experiments, robust design, response surfaces, and reliability. Topics and techniques discussed may also include product design and development, design team skills, and engineering project management. This communications-intensive course includes computer modeling and analysis and a significant design project. Prerequisites: ES180, CS150, MS252; or consent of instructor. (Students are expected to have completed or to be taking ET230/ES235 and ES245 concurrently.) Prerequisites: Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ES400 : Special Topics in Engineering — An upper-level course in engineering design or related topics. Topics to be determined based on student or faculty proposals. Prerequisites to be determined based on course level and content or approval of department chair and instructor. Cr. 1-3.

ES410 : Engr in Training Review — A review of topics that are normally covered on the EIT examination, plus material on how the examination is organized. Prerequisite: major in MSE, MET, PET; senior standing. Cr. 2

ES420 : Engineering Dynamics — A vector-based study of linear and angular kinematics, linear and angular kinetics, energy methods, impulse, momentum and kinetics of simple three dimensional motions. Prerequisites: ES205 and MS260. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ES425 : Engineering Dynamics II — An upper-level course in engineering mechanics. Topics include a detailed study in the kinematics and kinetics of a rigid body, vibration theory, Lagrangian mechanics, and the Hamiltonian function. Application of these techniques to the solution of practical engineering problems will be emphasized. Prerequisite: ES420. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ES430 : Machine Design — Application of the basic concepts of engineering statics, strength of materials, and dynamics to the design of machine elements. Analytical and empirical techniques are presented for the design and analysis of a variety of mechanical components including fasteners, springs, bearings, gears, shafts and couplings. Lubrication principles are introduced through bearing analysis. Prerequisites: ES235 and ES420 or permission of the instructor. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ES433 : Control Systems Engineering — Electromechanical control systems theory and applications to design and analysis of practical marine and industrial electromechanical automation and control systems. Topics include, Laplace transform analysis, mathematical modeling of dynamic systems, transient-response analysis, stability analysis, steady-state errors, and PID compensation, and will utilize computer analysis and simulation. Prerequisites: ET432 (Corequisite for 5 Year MSE students), MS260, Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ES490 : Numerical & Computer Methods for Enginee — A variety of numerical algorithms and techniques which may be employed in the solution of engineering problems. Topics may include solution of nonlinear equations, zeroes of polynomials, interpolation and approximation, curve fitting, numerical differentiation and integration, matrix manipulations, linear simultaneous equations, solution of first and higher order (and systems of) differential equations, finite difference approximation for derivatives, and mathematical modeling. Prerequisites: CS150 or CS151, and MS252. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ES491 : Intro to Reliability Engineering — This course investigates the relationship between design, manufacture, and the likelihood of failure at the component and system levels. Topics include a study of reliability mathematics, reliability testing, risk analysis, human factors, design of experiments, and reliability management. Application of these techniques to the solution of marine systems problems will be emphasized. Prerequisites: ES380 and MS260. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ES501 : Engineering Materials — An introduction to the structure and structural characteristics of materials used in engineering, including metallic alloys, ceramics, polymers, and composites. Methods of processing are emphasized. Prerequisites: ET230 or ES235 and CH301 or CH352. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ES510 : Engineering Test Laboratory — A laboratory experience through which students learn the basics of engineering testing. This communications-intensive course includes experiment design, instrument selection and calibration, data collection, analysis of data, and report writing and presentation. Prerequisites: ES235, ES245, ES251 or ES201. Lab. 3, Cr. 2.

ES598 : Capstone Design Preparation — Preparation for the major design project required in the final semester of all Marine Systems Engineering students. Each student or student team will work with an engineering faculty member to select a problem, collect reference materials, develop design objectives and specifications, select a design approach and methodology, and devise a detailed project plan. This course is communications intensive. (In special cases, course requirements may be satisfied through independent study.) Prerequisite: Marine Systems Engineering final year status or permission of the major Coordinator. Rec. 1, Cr. 1.

ES599 : Capstone Design Project — A communications-intensive project course in which the student, individually or as part of a team, applies his/her knowledge of engineering operations, engineering science, engineering design, and technical communications to analyze and create, communicate, and defend design solutions to an open-ended problem of practical interest approved by an engineering faculty member. Prerequisite: ES598. Rec. 1, Cr. 3.

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY   (↑ Top ↑)

ET101 : Graphics — Study and practice in lettering, use of tools, methods of geometric construction, multiview projection, orthographic representation, and delineation applied to marine technology and engineering. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 2, Lab 2, Cr. 3.

ET201 : Fluid Power — An introduction to applied fluid mechanics, including properties, hydrostatic pressure, flow and pressure, flow and pressure measurements, forces on areas, continuity equation, Bernoulli and general energy equations, analysis of piping systems for losses, and pump selection. These principles are applied to a variety of typical engineering problems in fluid systems. This course is designed to develop each student’s ability to analyze engineering problems. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisites: MS101 and CS150 (or equivalent). Rec 2, Lab 2, Cr. 3

ET202 : Statics and Dynamics — Study of static force systems, equilibrium, friction, and moments, and their application to structures, including trusses. Also includes study of simple dynamic systems, including kinematics of rectilinear and angular motion, force and inertia, work, energy, and power, the basics of oscillatory motion, and impulse and momentum. Prerequisites: MS110 or MS150, PS102 or PS162. Rec. 4, Cr. 4.

ET211 : Thermodynamics I — An introduction to heat and work processes that covers units, properties, energy, and the first and second laws of thermodynamics applied to ideal gas and steam processes. Prerequisite: ET201. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ET212 : Thermodynamics II — Power and refrigeration cycles, heat transfer, and contemporary problems in energy conversion. Prerequisite: ET211. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ET230 : Strength of Materials — Study of stresses and strains produced in materials due to tension, compression, shear, and torsion. Prerequisite: ET202. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ET351 : Thermal/Fluids Lab — Experiments in thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics, standard experimental techniques, data analysis, and report writing. Communications intensive. Prerequisite: ET211. Lab. 3, Cr. 2.

ET362 : Nature and Properties of Materials — This course introduces materials used in engineering applications along with guidelines for determining the appropriate materials for a given application. It also introduces fundamental science that determines the properties of materials, such as bonding types and atomic/molecular structures. Mechanical and physical properties of materials will be examined in the lectures and in laboratory exercises. Includes standard experimental techniques, mechanical and computerized data acquisition and analysis, and report writing. Communications intensive. Prerequisites: CH301, ET230, and ET452. Rec. 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3.

ET371 : Electrical Power I — Extension of electromagnetic principles to AC and DC circuits, including balanced three-phase AC, and their application to the analysis of DC and AC circuits. Includes meters, transformers, batteries, and three-phase AC. Introduction to practical operation of shipboard and industrial electrical systems. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisite: PS201 or PS261. Rec. 3, Lab. 2, Cr. 4.

ET377 : Engineering Economics — A study of economic theories and principles as applied to engineering decision making. It includes methods of compound interest, annual worth, and present worth, rate of return, benefit/cost ratio, capital allocation, depreciation, and risk analysis. Other topics will include revenue requirements, price level changes, and minimum attractive rate of return. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ET378 : Computer Applications For Power — A practical study of typical engineering software used in industry. Examples include the use of spreadsheet for economic studies, computer aided drafting, power plant controls, moving data from one analysis to another, and special topics chosen by the instructor. Prerequisite: CS150. Rec. 2, Lab. 3, Cr. 3.

ET399 : Special Topics in Engineering Technology — An upper-level course in engineering technology and related topics. Topics to be determined based on student or faculty proposals. Prerequisites to be determined based on course level and content or approval of department chair and instructor. Cr. 1-3.

ET401 : Automation and Control — A study of principles and hardware for control and automation systems as applied to processes in marine and shoreside power plants. Media studied include pneumatic, hydraulic, mechanical, and electrical/electronic. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisites: EG372, CE203 or CO200 or CO201 or CO203. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ET432 : Power Control Electronics — Operational amplifier theory, applications and troubleshooting of basic electronic components used to control electrical power, including diodes, transistors, SCRs, relays and related components. Circuits studied include operational amplifiers, rectifiers, transistor drivers, transducers, digital logic circuits. Applications may be taken from automation, AC and DC control circuits, battery charging systems and power supplies, and digital logic systems. Prerequisite: ES371 or ET371. Rec. 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3.

ET452 : Technical Communications — Extension of the theory and practice of communications tasks of a working engineer or technologist, including engineering proposals and reports; mechanism and process description; instructions, accident or casualty reports; technical specifications; and progress reports. Application of effective visual aids to both oral and written communications will be emphasized. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

ET482 : Heating, Ventilation, & Air Conditioning — A study of the components, functions, and operating principles of an air conditioning system with particular attention focused on the influence of temperature, humidity, and air motion as related to human comfort. Topics include psychometrics, air quality, capacity calculations for heat gain and loss, air distribution, and elementary refrigeration systems. Rec. 2, Cr. 2.

ET491 : Marine Engineering Technology Capstone I — A course in which the student, individually, applies his/her knowledge of engineering operations and engineering science to a project that gathers and interprets information from an operating power plant (marine or stationary). Upon completion of the project, the student will be required to defend a written summary. This project will incorporate elements of the MET curriculum to develop student competence in technical and non-technical skills to solve problems. This course may require the student to work as part of a team to collect data and/or other information to support their individual project, as well as the team project that is part of MET Capstone II. Prerequisites: CE203, EG372, and ET211. Rec.1, Cr. 1.

ET492 : Marine Engineer Technology Capstone II — A course in which the student, as part of a team, applies his/her knowledge of engineering operations, engineering science, and technical communications to orally defend and report on collected data from the ET491 Marine Engineering Technology Capstone I project. This project will draw together elements of the MET curriculum to develop student competence in technical and non-technical skills to solve engineering problems. Prerequisite: ET491. Rec. 1, Cr. 1.

ET498 : PET Capstone I — A course in which the student, individually, applies his/her knowledge of computer methods, engineering operations, engineering science and technical communications to analyze, create, communicate and defend a written technical project. Additionally, the course will introduce concepts of power plant operations, which build on previous PET curriculum material. This will include fossil power plant operations and technologies, using a power plant simulator, electrical grid operation and current topics of interest in the power generation industry. This course is a communications intensive and computer intensive course. Prerequisites: ET378, EG382 and EG431. Rec. 3, Lab. 2, Cr. 4.

ET499 : Power Engineering Technology Capstone II — A course in which the student, individually, and as part of a team, applies his/her knowledge of computer methods, engineering operations, engineering science and technical communications to analyze and create, communicate and defend a written project. At least one formal presentation will be included in this project. Additionally, the course will develop concepts of power plant operations, which build on previous PET curriculum material. This will include combined cycle power plant operations and technologies, using a power plant simulator, environmental considerations, professional ethics and current topics of interest in the power generation industry. This course is a communications intensive and computer intensive course. Prerequisite: ET498. Rec. 4, Lab. 2, Cr. 5.

GEOGRAPHY   (↑ Top ↑)

GE200 : World Regional Geography I — This course surveys the physical, economic, and historical patterns of the U.S., Canada, Latin America, Europe, Russia, and states of the former Soviet Union. Each of these regions will be explored with respect to landforms, resources, and cultures, as well as evolving economic and political systems. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

GE210 : World Regional Geography II — This course surveys the physical, economic, and historical patterns of the Middle East, North Africa, Asia, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands. Each of these regions will be explored with respect to landforms, resources, and cultures, as well as evolving economic and political systems. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

GE221 : Geographic Information Science — An introductory course in which students will learn the fundamentals of Geographic Information Science and its application to science, business and the social sciences. The course will include lectures, readings, and hands-on activities both on and beyond computers. Students will learn to use GIS software (e.g. ArcGIS, Google Maps, Map Window, CARIS, and/or NASA World Wind) to define and complete a research project. Topics covered will include integrating the basic concepts of cartography with GIS technologies; applying GIS to real world problems; understanding the ethical and social problems relevant to GIS; attaining and analyzing spatial data; and working with various GIS software packages. Rec. 3, Lab 3, Cr. 4

GE331 : Special Topics in Geography — An upper-level course in geography and related topics. Topics to be determined based on student or faculty proposals. Prerequisites to be determined based on course level and content or approval of department chair and instructor. Cr. 1-3.

HUMANITIES & COMMUNICATION   (↑ Top ↑)

HC111 : Composition — This course helps students develop a flexible writing process that can be adapted to a variety of situations. Critical thinking and argumentation are emphasized, and students practice basic research skills as they learn to write effectively in a professional voice. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HC112 : Humanities I — An interdisciplinary examination of the cultural roots of modern global society from the first civilizations through the middle Renaissance. Prerequisite: HC111. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HC160 : Spanish Level I — Introductory level includes the basics of the language with equal emphasis on developing reading, listening, writing, and speaking skills. For students with no previous study of the language or fewer than 2 years in high school. Cr. 3.

HC163 : French Level I — Introductory level includes the basics of the language with equal emphasis on developing reading, listening, writing, and speaking skills. For students with no previous study of the language or fewer than 2 years in high school. Cr. 3.

HC164 : French Level II — Intermediate level includes a systematic, but gradual review of the essentials of grammar and strengthens reading, writing, and especially speaking skills. Cr. 3.

HC171 : German Level I — Introductory level includes the basics of the language with equal emphasis on developing reading, listening, writing, and speaking skills. For students with no previous study of the language or fewer than 2 years in high school. Cr. 3.

HC190 : German Level II — Intermediate level includes a systematic, but gradual review of the essentials of grammar and strengthens reading, writing, and especially speaking skills. Cr. 3.

HC211 : Humanities II — An interdisciplinary examination of the cultural roots of modern global society from the late Renaissance to the present. Prerequisite: HC111. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HC232 : Management Communication — Students apply basic writing skills to produce various types of business communication, such as short and long reports, letters of inquiry, transmittals, proposal preparation, and organization of information for oral presentation using modern technological communication systems. Prerequisite: HC111. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HC260 : Sustainable Energy & Society — Energy use and policy is changing, with increased international energy demand and increasing environmental pressures. This course provides and overview of energy use in the US and the world, looking at how wer arrived at our current state of energy consumption. The course will cover energy technology, policy, economics and environmental effects of energy use, and the political and social issues related to energy consumption in the US and worldwide. Sustainability will be examined. This course fulfills the requirements of a Humanities/Social Science elective. Rec. 3, Lab. 0, Cr. 3.

HC300 : Independent Study — An independent research project or course to be arranged between the instructor and advanced student pursuing a humanities minor. Regular seminar meetings and an extensive research project required. Prerequisite: HC111, permission of instructor and advisor. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HC311 : Technology and Society I — A survey of the history of technology and an examination of the impact of inventions and innovations on Western society from ancient times to the present. Prerequisite: HC111. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HC321 : Film Appreciation — This course traces historical developments in film production (including types of framing, the introduction of camera motion, lens effects, the introduction of sound, etc.) and shows how these techniques lead to cinematic meaning. Prerequisite: HC111, Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HC331 : Special Topics in Humanities — An upper-level course allowing students to pursue various topics in the humanities. Topics might include: thematic or imagistic studies, or work of special genres, or individual authors, philosophers, composers and/or artists. Proposals may be student or instructor initiated. Prerequisites: HC112 and HC211 and approval of department chair and instructor. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HC333 : Basic Drawing — This course helps students understand the language of drawing, a means of communicating literal or imaginative pictorial ideas. Students will develop a vocabulary for drawing, and learn how to accurately represent on paper what one sees. This course will stress learning about the power of line, and perspective on a 2 dimensional surface so the work tells the viewer what the artist wants to say and that the drawing aspires to be art rather than a diagram. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HC337 : Peer Tutoring Workshop — This course prepares students to work in the MMA Writing Center as peer consultants. Topics include writing center theory and practice, an overview of disciplinary genres, and working with ESL and learning-disabled students. Writing process strategies are reviewed, as are such rhetorical elements as style, organization, grammar, punctuation and usage. Students complete the course with a practicum in the Writing Center. Prerequisite: HC111 and insructor permission, Rec. 1, Cr. 1.0

HC339 : Photography — This course is an introduction to the art and science of photography. Primary emphasis is placed on photographic fundamentals and skill development in the use of the 35mm camera and in printing photographs in the black-and-white darkroom. Principles and essentials for users of digital technology are also included. Attention to composition is stressed. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HC360 : Honors Seminar — An upper level, Humanities/Social Science elective course that will focus on an interdisciplinary study of current issues. This course is open to students with high aspirations who are nominated and invited by the faculty. Students will be eager to search for answers to difficult problems, and will critically analyze and discuss contemporary issues while challenging their opinions and beliefs across disciplines. For a description of this semester’s offering please see the course description on the portal. Prerequisites: Instructors permission, HC-111, 112 or 211. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HISTORY   (↑ Top ↑)

HY260 : American History 1500-1877 — Beginning with early civilizations in North America, this course recounts the settlement of the continent, the colonial and revolutionary periods, the early national period, sectionalism, the Civil War and Reconstruction. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HY270 : American History 1877-Present — This course examines both the internal growing pains of American society beginning in 1877 as well as the sometimes rocky U.S. rise to global power, tracing the country’s initial reluctance to enter world affairs to its status, at the end of the twentieth century, as the cultural, political, and economic leader of the world – the last superpower. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HY300 : Public History — This course looks at the presentation of historical information in popular culture. Through film, historical novels, museums, monuments, and web sites, students will examine the nature of the information provided and learn to critically evaluate the quality of what is presented. Prerequisite HY260 or HY270 or permission of the Instructor.

HY310 : Civil War and Reconstruction — The American Civil War still stands as the most destructive in this nation’s history. Resolving issues left untouched by the Declaration of Independence, the Revolutionary War, and the Constitution, the Civil War was a bitter and bloody fight to define and extend rights promised by the Founding Fathers. This course examines events leading to war, four years of armed conflict, and the Reconstruction period. Prerequisite: HY260 or HY300, or permission of instructor. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HY331 : Special Topics: History — An upper-level course allowing students to pursue various topics in the history. Proposals may be student or instructor initiated. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HY335 : The Atlantic World: 1400-1825 — The events and processes initiated by the Christopher Columbus’s voyage in 1492 transformed the world. The Atlantic Ocean – obstacle, frontier, and highway – connected and continues to shape the cultures and societies created by this Columbian exchange. This course examines the circumstances of European encounters with Africa and America, beginning with European voyages of exploration through the abolition of the slave trade in the nineteenth century. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HY360 : Twentieth-Century America — Frequently called “The American Century” the years 1900 to 2000 mark a time of immense change for the United States, both domestically and internationally. This course examines the evolution of America from involvement in WWI, through the Great Depression, WWII, the Cold War, the fall of the Soviet Union, and the end of the millennium. Prerequisite: Either HY260, HY270 or permission of the instructor. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

LOGISTICS   (↑ Top ↑)

LO201 : Business Logistics — An introduction to the field of business logistics and with a focus on inventory and its various components such as materials management, physical distribution, traffic management, warehousing, purchasing, inventory management, outsourcing, and logistics organization; an exposure to current trends and developments in logistics management. Also includes study of inventory management, including consideration of automated information and smart-buying techniques; distribution centers, warehousing, plant location, including optimization techniques and transport mode considerations. The course will serve as a complement to LO313 and a base for upper level logistics courses. Prerequisites: MA101, MA111, and sophomore standing or LSS dean’s permission. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

LO213 : Freight Transportation — Theory and case analysis pertaining to modal, intermodal and multimodal freight transportation with coverage of road, rail, air and water modes of transportation. Course focuses on the role of transportation in the logistics and supply chain processes including industry structure, capabilities, financial performance, key player analysis, and the contractual and pricing interface between shippers and carriers. Prerequisites: MA101, MA111, and sophomore standing or LSS dean’s permission. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

LO311 : Logistics Information Systems — Introduction to the application of information technology in logistics organizations and the roles of managers and staff professionals in developing and using information systems based on current and future technology. This course uses software packages and applications to solve logistics and transportation problems, and study of logistics related technologies. Prerequisites: LO201, MA101, MA111, and junior standing or LSS dean’s permission. Rec. 3, Lab. 2, Cr. 3

LO344 : Warehousing & Distribution Management — This course will study warehousing operations and physical distribution of inventory in the form of raw materials, semi-processed and finished goods in supply chains. Study of material handling equipment and packaging of goods and materials throughout the distribution center, warehouse, production operation, and related inbound and outbound transportation will be covered. Facility design and layout for efficient flow of materials will be introduced. Prerequisites: LO201, LO213, LO311 and junior standing, or LSS dean’s permission. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

LO346 : Global Sourcing &Procurement Negotiation — Acquisition of necessary goods, materials and services in exchange for funds or other remuneration. Locating qualified vendors, seeking alternative sources, and negotiating favorable terms are considered. Emphasis is placed on contemporary and emerging strategic considerations such as partnering with suppliers to design, develop and service product lines, and establishment of long-term prime vendor contracts. Prerequisites: LO201, LO311, junior standing, or LSS dean’s permission. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

LO400 : Coop Educational Experience in IBL — It is the responsibility of the student to find and secure the Co-Op experience. The IBL Co-Op is a period of full-time, paid, professional employment experience within the private or public sector including non-profit organizations. The earned position must be related to logistics or supply chain management, and which differs significantly from any previous employment experiences. All IBL students are required to earn a minimum of three Co-Op credits to be earned in twelve weeks of full-time employment or 480 hours. The student is required to complete several graded milestones prior to the summer co-op in addition to an extensive written project. The syllabus contains the necessary details of assignments and is subject to change each year. No student may earn more than four credits with LO400 during his/her enrollment at MMA and these credits cannot be substituted for any other degree or minor program requirements. Prerequisite: IBL program coordinator’s approval, junior standing or LSS Dean’s permission, and drug free certification required. Cr. 3-4.

LO422 : International Logistics — A study of the various components of international logistics system such as import/export procedures and documentation, international commercial and payment terms, world shipping markets, air and ocean freight management, third party logistics service providers, and cargo and financial risk management issues. Prerequisites: LO201, LO346, MA304 and senior standing or LSS dean’s permission. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

LO432 : Strategic Supply Chain Management — The study of logistics and supply chain potential future shifts and the drivers for those changes. Explores current events in supply chain, structural issues, and development of future direction, options and alternatives with roles that current students may play in that environment including inter-firm logistics integration, planning, sourcing, production, order management, distribution, administration, and customer relations that can be strategically harnessed to leverage strategic competitive advantage across multiple companies. Includes integrated supply chain metrics and performance measurement. The case method will be used to provide experience in integrating material from this and prior courses in the International Business and Logistics program. Prerequisites: LO201, LO213, LO344, MA312, and senior standing or LSS dean’s permission. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MANAGEMENT   (↑ Top ↑)

MA101 : Intro To Business & Supply Chain Mgmt — A foundation course that provides an overview of the fundamentals of business management in the context of global logistics and supply chain. It includes a conceptual framework for the managerial functions and challenges within and between companies in the creation and distribution of tangible goods, as well as the nature of contemporary business, current issues, and career opportunities. This course is a requirement of all IBL students even if a similar course is completed at another institution. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MA111 : Financial Accounting — An introduction to the preparation, use, and analysis of the four basic financial statements with an emphasis placed on the study of various financial transactions. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MA222 : Marketing Management — Focuses on the process of creating and fulfilling consumer and organizational needs through strategies involving the conception, pricing, promotion and distribution of ideas, goods and services in a market economy. The interrelationship of planning and marketing is explored throughout the course. Prerequisites: MA101, and sophomore standing or LSS dean’s permission. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MA242 : Managerial Accounting — An introduction to management decision making involving such topics as: cost/volume relationships, budgets and variances, the allocation of costs, and job costing and process costing. Prerequisite: MA111, and sophomore standing or LSS dean’s permission. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MA243 : Financial Management — An introduction to the study of asset pricing, risk management, project evaluation, and debt and dividend policies. Prerequisites: MA111, Sophomore standing or LSS dean’s permission. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MA304 : International Business — An introductory survey course to doing business globally. Course will focus on country differences, theories and issues in cross-border trade and investment, and global monetary system and competing in the global marketplace, with special emphasis on entry strategies and modes. Prerequisites: EC102, EC103, MA111, and Junior standing or LSS dean’s permission. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MA312 : Production And Operations Management — Building and managing world-class operations through Total Quality Management; designing, building, planning, and controlling Fast Response Organizations including demand management, process design, capacity strategy, facility location and layout, inventory management, performance measurement, and global enterprise integration. Prerequisites: LO201, MA101, MA111, and junior standing or LSS dean’s permission. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MA332 : Business Law — Course will examine elements of business law including its ethics and the U.S. judicial system. Topics to be covered include contract and employment law, business regulations, and corporate governance issues, and related case studies. Prerequisites: MA101 and junior standing or LSS dean’s permission. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MA401 : Seminar Strategic Mgmt & Org Behavior — This course addresses the processes and stakeholders that characterize and create the dynamics of contemporary organizational life. Topics such as organizational culture, conflict, group interaction, and structure are addressed from both a theoretical and “real world” perspective. Relevant case studies are considered to develop and broaden insight and analytical skills that are vital to manage, navigate, and lead organizations through change and growth. Prerequisites: LO400, and senior standing or LSS dean’s permission. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MA422 : International Business Law — The role of law in transnational commerce; traditional business law subjects (sales, commercial paper, etc.) as well as environmental subjects (trade regulations, employment, ethics, and others) are studied to assist managers in competing successfully in competitive global markets through development of skills to make judgments about the political and business risk of doing business internationally. Prerequisites: MA332, MA304, and senior standing at MMA or LSS dean’s permission. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MA470 : Applied Business Logistics Education — A community outreach program that aims to promote free enterprise and business principles while enhancing written and oral communication, leadership, self-discipline and teamwork skills. Will provide hands-on learning experience for students in business and economics, and also opportunities to network with local and national business leaders. Students in Free Enterprise involvement and project team participation required. Approval by department is required. Cr. 0.5-4

MA498 : Special Topics: IBL — A course allowing students to pursue advanced topics of international business and logistics not offered in the curriculum. Topics of study will depend on the interests of the student and supervising faculty member(s). Approval by department chair is required. Cr. 1-3.

MEDICINE   (↑ Top ↑)

MD310 : Medical Care Provider — A study of the assessment, recognition and treatment of various diseases and injuries that may be encountered in the workplace. This course includes first aid, CPR and blood borne pathogens. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MD311 : Medical Person In Charge — A course including didactic and mostly practical skills. Included will be IVs, medication administration, skeletal and spinal immobilization. Prerequisite: MD310. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MD312 : Emergency Medical Technician — A 120-hour course which follows the DOT curriculum. This course meets twice a week and 4 complete weekend days. This course includes didactic and practical skill instruction. Upon successful completion of the course the student may take the NREMT national boards which would allow the student to apply for a Maine State EMS license to work as an EMT-B on an ambulance. Text and completion of associated workbook are required. Rec. 6, Cr. 5.

MD331 : Special Topics in Medicine — An upper-level course allowing students to pursue various topics in Medicine. Proposals may be student or instructor initiated. Prerequisites: Approval of department chair and instructor. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MATHEMATICS   (↑ Top ↑)

MS101 : Pre-Calculus Mathematics — Includes linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, simultaneous linear equations, matrices, graphs, composite and inverse functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, complex numbers and the complex plane, basic trigonometry, and trigonometric identities and equations. Rec. 4, Cr. 4.

MS102 : Pre-Calculus, Part I — Part 1 of a 2-part pre-calculus sequence. Includes linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, complex numbers, basic trigonometry. To be followed by MS103. Rec. 3, Cr. 2.

MS103 : Pre-Calculus, Part II — Part 2 of a 2-semester pre-calculus sequence. Includes graphs, composite and inverse functions, simultaneous linear equations, matrices, logarithmic and exponential functions, and trigonometric identities and equations. Prerequisite: MS102. Rec. 3, Cr. 2.

MS110 : Technical Calculus I — Differential and integral calculus of algebraic and transcendental functions; applications, including physical problems, graphing and optimization; and basic integration, indefinite and definite integrals. Prerequisite: MS101 or equivalent. Rec. 4, Cr. 4.

MS120 : Technical Calculus II — A second course in calculus, covering further techniques of integration, calculus of transcendental functions, functions of several variables, infinite series, and an introduction to ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite: MS110. Rec. 4, Cr. 4.

MS141 : Finite Math — A course designed to develop the mathematical skills considered important for business students and prepare them for business calculus. Topics include: algebra review, linear functions, systems of linear equations and matrices, linear programming, the mathematics of finance, logic, sets, elementary probability and statistics, game theory, digraphs and networks, and nonlinear functions. Rec. 4, Cr. 4.

MS150 : Calculus I — Functions, analytic geometry, limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic functions and applications; study of graphs maxima and minima, methods of approximation; and elementary integration, indefinite and definite integrals. Rec. 4, Cr. 4.

MS151 : Calculus For Business — A course designed to develop the mathematical skills considered important for business students. The primary emphasis is on the calculus for functions of one variable and its applications. Note: It is recommended that students planning to pursue graduate studies or those on an NROTC scholarship should take MS150. Prerequisite: MS101 or equivalent. Rec. 4, Cr. 4.

MS160 : Calculus II — Applications of the integral, advanced methods of integration, analytic geometry, the calculus of transcendental functions, improper integration, conics and polar coordinates, and the introduction of infinite series and the calculus of several variables. Prerequisite: MS150 or permission of the Mathematics Coordinator. Rec. 4, Cr. 4.

MS251 : Prob & Statistics For Eng & Science — An introductory, calculus-based course in probability and statistics with an emphasis on engineering and scientific applications. Topics include: descriptive statistics; probability (basic probability and discrete and continuous random variables and their distributions); point and interval estimation; hypothesis testing of sample means, proportions, and variances; regression models; use of statistical software. Applications will include reliability and experimental design. Prerequisites: a Computer Science course or evidence of computer literacy, and MS150. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MS252 : Engineering Math I — An introduction to applied mathematics useful in applied science and design engineering. Topics include infinite series formation, both functional and numerical, in pursuit of non-analytical solution, numerical techniques with emphasis on error analysis, vector calculus and linear algebra. Applications include, but are not limited to, chemical reaction, electrical circuits, curvilinear regression for experimental data, oscillatory systems, fluid force, coupled systems and mathematical modeling of dynamic systems. Use of computer generated solution is encouraged. Prerequisite: MS120 or MS160. Rec. 4, Cr. 4.

MS253 : Statistics For Business & Management — An introductory, algebra-based course in statistics with an emphasis on business and managerial applications. Topics include descriptive statistics; basic probability and random variables; point and interval estimation; hypothesis testing of sample means and proportions; linear regression and correlation; and use of statistical software. Applications will include decision making, quality management, statistical process control, and time-series forecasting models. Prerequisite: a Computer Science course or evidence of computer literacy. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MS260 : Differential Equations — A first course in ordinary differential equations with emphasis on analytic solution. Topics include existence and uniqueness of solution, first order equations, linear and selected nonlinear higher order equations, and solution by Laplace transforms, numerical solution and introduction to solution by series. Applications selected from mechanics, biology, thermodynamics, resonance, electrical networks, automatic control and servomechanisms, epidemiology and ecology. Mathematical formulation and design are stressed in all applications. Prerequisite: MS120 or MS160. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MS299 : Special Topics in Mathematics — A course allowing a student to pursue topics or sequences of topics not otherwise offered. Proposals are to be student initiated, in consultation with an instructor. Prerequisite: Department and instructor approval. Rec. 1-3, Cr. 1-3.

MS451 : Engineering Mathematics II — A second course in applied mathematics for applied science and design engineering students. Topics include review of eigenvectors, eigenvalues and orthogonality, Taylor series method, Picard’s method of iteration, method of Frobenius, Bessel’s equation, Legendre’s equation, Strum-Liouville problems, Fourier series and analysis, Gram-Schmidt orthonormalization and self-adjoin differential equations. Partial differential equations such as the heat equation, wave equation and potential equation are formulated using basic physical principles and brought to solution. The Laplacian in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinates is investigated. Application to design analysis and dynamical systems is stressed. Prerequisites: MS252 and MS260. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NAVAL ARCHITECTURE   (↑ Top ↑)

NA152 : Ship Structure & Stability — Presents the principles of naval architecture and their application to modern vessels. Describes the procedures used in the determination of ship characteristics; damaged and undamaged stability including topics like loose water, flooding and grounding; and typical ship construction and ship building procedures, tests, and ship’s trials. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NA321 : Offshore Technology — An introduction to the offshore drilling industry. Topics include: structure of the industry, rig design and construction, sub-sea equipment, mooring and anchor handling, supply and logistics, drilling operations and equipment, and stability and loading. Prerequisite: NS301 or NA152 or permission of instructor. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NA372 : Naval Architecture I — Theory and practice of naval architecture, basic principles and design calculations; terminology, hull form geometry, buoyancy, intact and damaged stability and trim, ship strength and powering. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisites: ET230 or ES235, and ET201 or ES245. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NA430 : Naval Architecture II — Ship dynamics. This course continues the development of naval architecture topics including resistance and powering, seakeeping, and maneuvering. In parallel, students will develop a concept design for a small vessel based on a set of mission requirements. Prerequisite: NA372. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NA499 : Topics Naval Architecture — A course allowing students to pursue advanced topics in Naval Architecture not offered in the curriculum. Topics of study will depend on the interests of the student and supervising faculty member(s). Approval by department chair is required. Cr. 1-3.

NA599 : Capstone Design Project — A communications-intensive ship design project in which the student, individually or as part of a team, applies his/her knowledge of ship stability, strength, resistance, powering, machinery selection, and general arrangements to complete a concept design from a set of performance requirements. Students will apply modern computer tools for naval architecture to calculate hull shape, hydrostatics, damage stability, and resistance. Students will present their final design and defend design decisions. Prerequisite: NA372, NA430. Rec. 1, Cr. 3

NAUTICAL SCIENCE   (↑ Top ↑)

NS101 : Introduction to Nautical Science — An introduction to nautical science which covers basic skills that would put the student at the able bodied seaman level of knowledge and prepare the student for the U.S. Coast Guard lifeboat examination. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 2.

NS102 : Ship Structure — An introduction to ship construction as it relates to all types of vessels. Basic naval architecture and management functions regarding ship structure are stressed. Topics include hull structure and components, vessel design process, design stresses, tonnage measurements, and load line assignment. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisites: EG101 and NS101. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NS103 : Introduction to Vessel Operations — This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of the Small Vessel Operations. It is designed to run concurrently with NS 101 and augment the seamanship skills taught in that class. The curriculum includes basic nomenclature, small vessel propulsion and handling, safety and regulations pertinent to the Small Vessel industry. The lab portion of the course is taught by the Waterfront Staff and will provide students with the opportunity to put classroom concepts into safe practice aboard vessels on the water. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 2, Lab 2, Cr. 2.

NS122 : Cargo I — A study of vessel cargo and the role of the ship in integrated transportation systems. At the introductory level topics include cargo responsibility, fundamental objectives of good stowage, and a survey of cargo gear. The role of the ship’s officer is examined and related to various types of vessels and cargo operations. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NS131 : Introduction to Marine Transportation — A current overview of the maritime industry, what it consists of, how it operates, how it is characterized economically, and how it is regulated. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NS132 : Small Craft Technology — Introduction to the fundamentals of the engine and drive-train typically found aboard small craft. Emphasis is on the high speed marine diesel engine, the theory of its operation and the understanding of its associated components. Fuel, air, lubrication, and cooling systems are covered. The lab includes the disassembly, inspection, re-assembly and running of a small diesel engine. Rec. 2, Lab. 3, Cr. 3.

NS135 : Small Craft Construction — An introduction to the fundamentals of building small craft. While the major focus will be on wooden boat plans and construction, the course will also cover steel, aluminum and fiberglass construction methods. Vessel construction terminology, the process of lofting, and scantling requirements are discussed. The lab is focused on the building of a 14 foot flat bottomed wooden skiff. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3

NS210 : Tanker Operations — Tanker Operations — This course meets the USCG formal education requirements for Dangerous Liquid Cargo Person In Charge (PIC) (46cfr 13.209), Tankerman Engineer (46 cfr 13.509) and the competence requirements of Table A-V/1-1-2 of the STCW Code as amended for the Minimum Standard of Competence In Advanced Training for Oil Tanker Cargo Operations. Provided evidence of 90 days of service in deck or engine departments of one or more tank vessels for the following limitations a Tankerman-Engineer endorsement shall be limited to maintenance and repair of cargo equipment or Tankerman-PIC (Barge) (DL) endorsement be limited to Non-Self Propelled barges.
Successful completion of this course will lead to the issuance of the Dangerous Liquid Cargo Certificate and credited with 2 loads & 2 discharges toward the Tankerman PIC endorsement. The presentations will highlight areas of principal concern to the junior officers, especially those necessary to minimize the possibility of accidents and pollution. Included are a detailed study of cargo handling procedures, inert gas systems and crude oil washing, environmental protection, tanker safety practices, and other required topics associated with tank vessel operations. Rec. 3, Lab. 2, Cr. 4.

NS221 : Meteorology — Basic concepts of meteorology with particular emphasis on marine applications. This includes a study of ocean winds and weather with the plotting and analysis of weather maps, weather routing of ships, and familiarization with the various Weather Bureau publications and services. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NS232 : Marine Systems — Electrical and mechanical system fundamentals, associated with yachts and small commercial vessels, are examined. These include: DC electrical theory and installation standards, storage batteries, multi-meter use, AC electricity, pumping systems, refrigeration, reverse-osmosis water makers and hydraulics, ABYC standards and CFR requirements are covered. The lab explores DC circuits, wiring standards, systems operation, installation and maintenance. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisite: NS132. Rec. 2, Lab 2, Cr. 3.

NS241 : Seamanship — Seamanship refers to a body of practical knowledge that is essential to creative solutions at sea, as well as to routine shipboard operations. Through labs and lectures the student will be acquainted with the information and practical skills associated with rigging, mechanical advantage, deck equipment, hardware, maintenance, and line handling and safety procedures. The course includes material appropriate to functioning as an Able Bodied Seaman, as well as to efficiently organizing the work of others. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisite: NS101. Rec. 2, Lab 2, Cr. 2.

NS262 : Navigation Rules — The International and Inland Rules of the Road for preventing collisions at sea. This includes application, definitions, lights and shapes, steering and sailing rules with sound signals for vessels in meeting, crossing, and overtaking situations, and conduct of vessels in restricted visibility. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NS271 : Terrestrial Navigation I — An introductory navigation course intended for all students pursuing a license for any tonnage class. The rudiments of navigation are covered in lecture format. Topics include: charts, plotting tools and techniques, dead reckoning, gyro and magnetic compasses and their errors, fixes and running fixes, set and drift, tidal and current calculations, navigation publications, and chart correcting and piloting with electronic navigation instruments. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NS272 : Terrestrial Navigation Lab — Weekly exercises aboard Academy watercraft and in the Academy’s Bridge and Navigation Simulator allow the student to practice the skills taught in NS271. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with NS271. Lab 3, Cr. 1.

NS282 : Celestial Navigation I — A celestial navigation course intended for students pursuing an unlimited Third Mate’s license or an ocean endorsement for a limited tonnage license. This course will cover the basic practices of celestial navigation. Emphasis is placed on solutions of the various celestial navigation calculations involving the sun. Topics covered are: time from a navigational standpoint, essentials of nautical astronomy, time diagrams, the nautical almanac, sight reduction of the sun, time of celestial phenomena, local apparent noon, noon sights, azimuths, and amplitudes of the sun. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisites: NS271 and NS272. Rec. 4, Cr. 3.

NS292 : Electronic Navigation — Introduction to electronic navigation topics including theory, practical operation, and use of modern shipboard electronic navigation instruments. Successful completion of the marine radar portion of this course, the co-requisite NS293 course, and the follow-on course (NS498) leads to certification as Radar Observer as approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Pre-requisites: NS271 and NS272. Co-requisite: NS293. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NS293 : Electronic Navigation Lab — Weekly exercises in the RADAR simulator allow the student to practice and develop skills in interpreting RADAR information and using RADAR for collision avoidance, as well as applying theory taught in NS292. Successful completion of this course is necessary for certification as a USCG RADAR Observer. This course supports the marine license requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification, and Watchkeeping (STCW). Co-requisite: NS292. Lab 1, Cr. 1

NS298 : Topics in Small Vessel Operations — A capstone course intended to further prepare 200 ton license candidates for positions of responsibility aboard a limited tonnage vessel. This course will expand the student’s knowledge of vessel design, construction, stability, emergency maneuvers and operations. Attention is also given to crew management, regulatory issues, and the variety of decisions that a professional mariner may expect to face. Prerequisite: NS241. Rec. 2, Cr. 2.

NS299 : 200 Ton License Seminar — Course to assist senior license candidates in preparing to write the appropriate USCG license examination. Sample tests will be used, test-taking techniques studied and study guides reviewed. The use of CFRs and other references will be covered. Rec. 2, Cr. 1.

NS301 : Stability — Principles, terms, and procedures used in determination of transverse, longitudinal, and damage stability of ships of all sizes. Examines the physical laws affecting a floating body. Includes the effects of cargo operations, loose water, fuel consumption, grounding, and flooding on vessel stability and examines cases involving loss of stability. Calculating and adjusting trim are also covered. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisite: NS102 for MTO students; NS135 for VOT students. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NS321 : Weather Routing — This course will build on the basics of meteorology learned in NS221, Meteorology. The student will learn to locate, organize and interpret various weather products from commercial and government sources, including facsimile maps, internet sites and commercial weather software. The student will utilize these products to plan and execute “virtual voyages” in real-time, making vessel routing decisions for chosen vessels on fictitious voyages. Prerequisite: NS221. Rec. 2, Lab 2, Cr. 3.

NS332 : Marine Communications — This course offers a comprehensive study of the various maritime communications, stressing distress and safety communications including, but not limited to; radiotelephone procedures GMDSS FCC regulations, and flag and flashing light signaling. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisite: NS292 and NS293. Rec. 2, Lab. 3, Cr. 3.

NS335 : Yacht Management — This course is designed to address the major challenges facing those who manage and typically captain both privately owned and chartered yachts. Topics covered include an overview of the yacht industry and the captain’s responsibilities for fiduciary obligations, crew management, trip planning, and offshore passage making. Shipyard/haul out planning and management are also addressed. A major project for the course is the development of an individual trip plan. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NS341 : Auxiliary Sail Vessel Operations — This course will prepare the student to sail as a deckhand or mate aboard an inspected auxiliary sail vessel, as well as to sit for the USCG Auxiliary Sail License Exam. (Sea experience will have to be documented by the student on his/her own time in order to qualify for the license.) The successful student who earns his/her license will be qualified to sail as mate or master on USCG certified auxiliary sailing vessels such as passenger vessels, charter vessels and training vessels. Subject areas will include sail theory, sail vessel handling, heavy weather sailing, rules and regulations, voyage planning and emergency procedures. Labs will take advantage of the academy-owned sailing yachts and the schooner Bowdoin, including one weekend cruise aboard the Bowdoin. Prerequisites: NS101, PE200, PS102 or permission of the instructor. Rec. 2, Lab 2, Cr. 3.

NS342 : Workboat Operations — This course provides a background in the operation and management of limited tonnage vessels, particularly those used in support of the offshore energy industry. Topics include vessel design, cargo operations, and vessel management. Lab sessions aboard the M/V Pentagoet require students to develop proficiency in all aspects of the vessel’s operation. Emphasis is placed on advanced close-quarters maneuvering. Prerequisites: NS345. Rec. 2, Lab. 3, Cr. 3.

NS343 : Modern Sail Vessel Technology — This is a lab course which will introduce the student to modern rigging and sail making skills (including concepts and materials) and their application to professional sailors. Topics to be covered include: assembly and maintenance of double/exotic braid running rigging, leading edge sail construction methods and repair, selection of standing rigging, tuning of multi-spreader rigs, handling characteristics associated with rig tune, winches and furling systems, spars, and safety while working aloft. Prerequisite: NS241, PE200. Lab 6, Cr. 3.

NS344 : Traditional Vessel Technology — Through a mixture of lab and lecture, this course addresses the skills and the historical contexts which are part of maintaining and operating traditionally rigged sailing vessels in the present day. These skills include assembly and maintenance of wire and rope rigging, setting up and tuning this rigging, up-rigging and down-rigging of complex rigs safely, including sending heavy spars aloft, caulking wooden hulls and decks, spar making, block maintenance, working aloft, and general rig safety. Prerequisite: NS241. Lab 6, Cr. 3.

NS345 : Ship Handling — During this course, students will develop the knowledge and practical ability needed to be a boat and ship handler. Topics include propulsion systems, ship maneuvering, anchoring, docking and undocking, emergency situations, ship pilots, ship to ship interaction, channel effects and tug use. Classroom lecture, launch and tug use, as well as the shiphandling simulator are used to present the material. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 2, Lab. 3, Cr. 3.

NS381 : Terrestrial Navigation II — A continuation of Terrestrial Navigation I. Students will study the Sailings and other material related to voyage planning. Additional topics include fuel consumption calculations, slip, calculating ETAs and tide and current predictions. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisites: NS271 and NS272. Rec. 4, Cr. 3.

NS399 : Ind Study in Mar Trans & Nautical Sci — INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MARINE TRANSPORTATION AND NAUTICAL SCIENCE – Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Cr. 1.

NS400 : Ind Study in Mar Trans & Nautical Sci — INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MARINE TRANSPORTATION AND NAUTICAL SCIENCE – Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Cr. 3.

NS412 : Advanced Tanker Operations — An elective course for students planning to sail aboard tank vessels which examines the current theories, principles, and practices of tanker operations. The course is designed to solidify and increase the student’s knowledge of operations and management skills aboard various types of tankers through lectures and lab simulations. Prerequisite: NS210, or ET201 and EG234. Cr. 3.

NS415 : RMS Titanic — The course will explore the history of the RMS Titanic, addressing in particular certain aspects of that history which offer lessons for today’s mariner. This should give the student a better in-depth understanding of principles he or she is currently studying in other courses. Particular emphasis will be placed on Hollywood’s treatment of the subject, bridge team management, lifeboats, stability, and ship’s structure. This course will also address social responsibility issues. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NS420 : Ship’s Business — This course addresses the administrative aspect of the master’s job aboard ship. Subject areas include applicable U.S. Laws, international codes and conventions, vessel security, shipping articles, logbooks, documents and certificates, Customs and Immigration paperwork, cargo paperwork, charter parties, and dealing with domestic and foreign authorities. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NS443 : Rigging Technology — A hands-on lab course which will build on modern and traditional rigging skills and concepts introduced in Modern Sail Vessel Technology and Traditional Vessel Technology. Topics to be covered include: Static and dynamic tuning of multi-spreader rigs and lower aspect traditional rigging, assembly and maintenance of selection of standing/running rigging, handling characteristics associated with rig tune, winches and furling systems, spars, and safety while working aloft. Course materials will focus on emerging regulatory changes around self-inspection, legal documentation, and maintenance of Inspected Sailing Vessels rigging practices. Prerequisite: Ns-343,Modern Sail Vessel Technology, Ns-344, Traditional Vessel Technology. Lab 6, Cr. 3.

NS445 : Sailmaking Technology — A hands-on lab course which will build on modern and traditional sailmaking skills and concepts introduced in Modern Sail Vessel Technology. Students will inspect and repair sails from MMA vessels, design/construct a traditional sail and design/construct a modern sail utilizing CAD technology. Students will be held to high standards resulting in professional quality sails for usage in MMA’s sailing programs: Prerequisite: Ns-343,Modern Sail Vessel Technology. Lab 6, Cr. 3.

NS461 : Casualty Analysis — Applications of navigation rules with emphasis on the analysis of selected cases and court interpretations. Emphasis on the safety implications of marine casualties as well as casualty management as it relates to applicable federal rules and regulations. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisite: NS262. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NS471 : Tug And Barge Operations — Basic theory and practice on towing barges with a tug. Includes types of tugs and their functions, stability and design, towing theory, preparations for tows, interface with regulatory agencies, documentation and safety, and practical towing exercises. Prerequisites: NS271, NS272, and NS345. Rec. 1, Lab. 6, Cr. 3.

NS491 : Advanced Navigation — This course will integrate the components of terrestrial navigation and celestial navigation. Emphasis will be placed on the duties of the second mate. Preparatory instruction for U.S. Coast Guard licensing examinations will additionally take place in this course. Prerequisites: NS282 and NS381. Rec. 4, Cr. 3.

NS493 : Electronic Navigation II — Provides instruction including practical simulation based training in integrated navigation systems, concentrating on Electronic Chart Display and Information Systems (ECDIS). Topics include: the use of ECDIS in navigation, voyage planning and voyage monitoring; precautions to observe when using ECDIS; ECDIS sensor input, including AIS, GPS, gyro-compass, fathometer and speed log; use of ECDIS with alternative positioning sources. Prerequisites: NS292, NS493 and NS381. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 2, Lab 2, Cr. 3.

NS496 : Topics in Marine Transportation — A course allowing students to pursue advanced topics in Marine Transportation not offered in the curriculum. Topics of study will depend on the interests of the student and supervising faculty member(s). Approval by department chair is required. Cr. 1-3.

NS497 : Watchkeeping Limited Tonnage — This course makes extensive use of the simulator to prepare the student to stand a safe navigational watch, performing the required collision avoidance, navigation, communications, and vessel management functions. During the course students are trained and certified in the use of ARPA. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisites: CR313, NS262, NS271, NS272, NS292 and NS293. Rec. 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3.

NS498 : Watchkeeping — Extensive use of simulator training will occur in this course. Particular emphasis will be placed on radar, ARPA, collision avoidance and bridge team management techniques. Successful completion of this course will result in certification as a radar observer as per USCG regulations. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisites: NS262, NS271, NS272, NS292, NS293, NS345, CD203 and CD303. Rec. 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3.

NS499 : License Seminar — An in-depth review of topics found on the U.S. Coast Guard Third Mate’s examination. Mock examinations and quizzes are used extensively. Topics include seamanship, rules and regulations, stability, navigation rules, and ship’s business. Rec. 1, Cr. 1.

NAVAL SCIENCE   (↑ Top ↑)

NV100 : Naval Leadership Lab I — A series of laboratories designed to provide student application of leadership techniques, and to prepare NROTC members for leadership positions in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. Lab. 2, Cr. 0 (each term).

NV101 : Naval Orientation — This course introduces the student to the organization of the U.S. Navy. The course also introduces the student to the career paths available in aviation, surface warfare, nuclear power, and the Marine Corps. An understanding of the responsibilities of a naval officer, the Navy’s mission, general military information, and the applications of these concepts within the Navy are also stressed. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NV200 : Naval Leadership Lab II — A series of laboratories designed to provide student application of leadership techniques, and to prepare NROTC members for leadership positions in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. Lab. 2, Cr. 0 (each term).

NV202 : Seapower and Maritime Affairs — In this course, students study the influence of sea power, ships, and trade from colonial days to the present. Emphasis will be placed on American naval history since 1775, the evolution of ships from sail to steam, and the effects of war on seagoing America. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NV211 : Naval Weapons Systems — This course provides an in-depth study of the theory and principles of operation of contemporary naval weapons systems. It includes coverage of weapon system types, capabilities and limitations, theory of target acquisition, identification and tracking, sonar, and basics of radar theory. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NV222 : Naval Science For Strat Sealift Officer — A continuation of NV101, this course provides prospective Strategic Sealift Officers with a fundamental understanding of their role in our national security and familiarizes them with the basic principles and procedures for operating a merchant ship as a naval or military auxiliary in a wartime convoy or independent sailing situation. Specific shipboard techniques and the total sea power objectives will be explored to familiarize the student with particular aspects of naval control of shipping, underway operations, and a variety of organizational relationships. Prerequisite: NV101. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NV300 : Naval Leadership Lab III — A series of laboratories designed to provide student application of leadership techniques, and to prepare NROTC members for leadership positions in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. Lab. 2, Cr. 0 (each term).

NV301 : Naval Navigation — This course provides the student with the fundamental understanding and a practical working capability in safe navigation. Included are a comprehensive treatment of coastal piloting, inland and international rules of the road, and an introduction to meteorology as it pertains to heavy weather conditions at sea. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NV302 : Naval Operations & Seamanship — This course familiarizes the student with the functions and responsibilities of the junior naval officer in the areas of shipboard operations and administration. Included are a comprehensive study of relative motion, naval communications, ship operations, formation maneuvering, replenishment at sea, and naval command and control. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NV310 : The Evolution of Warfare — This course traces the development of warfare from the dawn of recorded history to the present, focusing on the impact of major military theorists, strategists, tacticians and technological developments. The student acquires a basic sense of strategy, develops an understanding of military alternatives, and learns the impact of historical precedent on military thought and action. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NV400 : Naval Leadership Lab IV — A series of laboratories designed to provide student application of leadership techniques, and to prepare NROTC members for leadership positions in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. Lab. 2, Cr. 0 (each term).

NV401 : Leadership & Management — Naval organization and management practices are examined within the context of American social and industrial organization for logistics, service, support functions, and service of major components of the Navy and Marine Corps shipboard organization. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NV402 : Leadership & Ethics — The purpose of this course is to sharpen the student’s understanding of some important issues about morality and to develop moral reasoning ability. The course integrates an intellectual exploration of Western moral traditions and ethical philosophy with topics and issues confronting newly commissioned officers as military leaders. The course provides a foundation in major moral traditions, including Utilitarianism, Kantian ethics, Constitutional Law, Natural Law theory, and virtue ethics. In addition, students will discuss the ethics of war through discussions of the Just War Theory (Jus Ad Bellum) and the Conduct of War (Jus Ad Bello). Readings will be from various fields, including leadership, ethics, philosophy, theology, and law and will be enhanced through case studies, video segments, and current issues in the news. It is recommended that students be in their junior or senior year; however they need not be in the NROTC program. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NV411 : Fundamentals of Maneuver Warfar — Fundamentals of Maneuver Warfare: [Replaces NV 410 Amphibious Warfare] Broad aspects of warfare and their interactions with maneuver warfare doctrine. Focus on the United States Marine Corps as the premier maneuver warfare fighting institution. Historical influences on current tactical, operational, and strategic implications of maneuver warfare practices. Case studies. Enrollment preference to NROTC students. Prerequisites: NV310 or instructor permission. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NV442 : Naval Sci For Strat Sealift Officer II — This course is designed to familiarize the prospective Ensign with naval policies, procedures, protocols, and responsibilities as they relate to the Strategic Sealift Officer (SSO) Program. Included are a comprehensive discussion of commissioning responsibilities, planning for and completing the first annual training, and the operation and mission of the SSO Program. Prerequisites: NV101 and NV222. Rec. 1, Cr. 1.

OCEAN STUDIES   (↑ Top ↑)

OC101 : Introduction to Ocean Science — An introduction to the concepts of physical, geological, chemical, and biological ocean science. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3.

OC210 : Physical Oceanography — An introduction to ocean circulation and physical aspects of the ocean’s water. Ocean physics exerts important controls on marine life so this course is designed for all students interested in the ocean as a system. Rec. 3, Lab 3, Cr. 4

OS001 : OS Seminar I — A seminar format course covering topics in the ocean sciences and related areas of interest. Designed to develop communication and critical thinking skills, the course utilizes group discussion and library research to understand and interpret presentations by invited speakers. Topics will be addressed with increasing depth and sophistication as students progress through the series. All Marine Biology and Marine Science majors are required to enroll in this sequence for every semester in residence except the first-year fall and fourth-year spring semesters. Rec. 1, Cr. 1.

OS002 : OS Seminar II — A seminar format course covering topics in the ocean sciences and related areas of interest. Designed to develop communication and critical thinking skills, the course utilizes group discussion and library research to understand and interpret presentations by invited speakers. Topics will be addressed with increasing depth and sophistication as students progress through the series. All Marine Biology and Marine Science majors are required to enroll in this sequence for every semester in residence except the first-year fall and fourth-year spring semesters. Rec. 1, Cr. 1.

OS003 : OS Seminar III — A seminar format course covering topics in the ocean sciences and related areas of interest. Designed to develop communication and critical thinking skills, the course utilizes group discussion and library research to understand and interpret presentations by invited speakers. Topics will be addressed with increasing depth and sophistication as students progress through the series. All Marine Biology and Marine Science majors are required to enroll in this sequence for every semester in residence except the first-year fall and fourth-year spring semesters. Rec. 1, Cr. 1.

OS004 : OS Seminar IV — A seminar format course covering topics in the ocean sciences and related areas of interest. Designed to develop communication and critical thinking skills, the course utilizes group discussion and library research to understand and interpret presentations by invited speakers. Topics will be addressed with increasing depth and sophistication as students progress through the series. All Marine Biology and Marine Science majors are required to enroll in this sequence for every semester in residence except the first-year fall and fourth-year spring semesters. Rec. 1, Cr. 1.

OS005 : Seminar V — A seminar format course covering topics in the ocean sciences and related areas of interest. Designed to develop communication and critical thinking skills, the course utilizes group discussion and library research to understand and interpret presentations by invited speakers. Topics will be addressed with increasing depth and sophistication as students progress through the series. All Marine Biology and Marine Science majors are required to enroll in this sequence for every semester in residence except the first-year fall and fourth-year spring semesters. Rec. 1, Cr. 1.

OS006 : OS Seminar VI — A seminar format course covering topics in the ocean sciences and related areas of interest. Designed to develop communication and critical thinking skills, the course utilizes group discussion and library research to understand and interpret presentations by invited speakers. Topics will be addressed with increasing depth and sophistication as students progress through the series. All Marine Biology and Marine Science majors are required to enroll in this sequence for every semester in residence except the first-year fall and fourth-year spring semesters. Rec. 1, Cr. 1.

OS101 : Intro to Marine Science — An introduction to the physics, chemistry, geology, and biology of the oceans. Laboratory emphasis is on sampling and sensing methods, data analysis, and the interaction of marine environmental phenomena. Rec. 3, Lab. 3, Cr. 4.

OS203 : Design & Applied Stat In Science — This course instructs the student in the practical application of statistical methods in the sciences. Topics include: introduction to statistical methodology and software, how to select appropriate statistical techniques for data description or hypothesis testing, how to analyze statistical output; how to design laboratory and field experiments, how to design sampling programs, and how to communicate the results of statistical analyses in oral, written, and graphical methods. Prerequisites: BI201 and BI301. Rec. 3, Lab. 3, Cr. 4.

OS204 : Physical Geology — An introduction to geology. The minerals and sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks that make up the earth are examined. The course includes a survey of the processes that shape the earth, such as: plate tectonics, wind, water, glaciers, volcanism, and mass wasting. Processes internal to the earth such as earthquakes, and effects of these processes, such as faulting and folding are also examined. Rec. 3, Lab. 3, Cr. 4.

OS211 : Marine Geology — The geology of the deep ocean and continental margins is examined including the formation of these provinces and modification through sedimentation. Presents the role of plate tectonics in shaping the oceans and the role of biology and chemistry in sedimentation. Prerequisite: OS204 or OS308. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

OS212 : Marine Geochemistry — An examination of the major chemical features of the oceans in the context of the biological, physical and geological processes that shape them. Labs focus on the sampling and analysis of seawater, and related data analysis. Prerequisite: CH220. Rec. 3, Lab 1, Cr. 4.

OS213 : Biological Oceanography — Biological oceanography is an interdisciplinary field of study that examines the factors and processes that influence the distribution and abundance of marine organisms. These factors and processes include ecological and biological interactions between marine organisms as well as interactions between marine organisms and their surrounding chemical, physical and geological ocean environment. Topics to be covered include reviews of the physical and chemical processes that influence marine biota (e.g. nutrient cycling, light dynamics, stratification, upwelling, tidal mixing, etc), controls and patterns in marine primary productivity, secondary productivity processes and food web interactions, the microbial loop, and human impacts on ocean biology. Prerequisites: OS101. Rec.3, Cr. 3.

OS300 : Scientific Diving — The Scientific Diving course is designed to acquaint certified recreational SCUBA divers with various scientific diving procedures and techniques in order to qualify participants to dive under the auspices of the American Academy of Underwater Sciences (AAUS) both nationally and internationally. After successful completion of this course and approval by the MMA Diving Control Board, these candidates qualify for verification of training from MMA as AAUS certified Scientific Divers. Prerequisites: PE 303 or Permission of Instructor. Rec. 1, Lab. 3, Cr. 2.

OS308 : The Earth — An introduction to geology. The minerals and sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks that make up the earth are examined. The course includes a survey of the processes that shape the earth, such as: plate tectonics, wind, water, glaciers, volcanism, and mass wasting. Processes internal to the earth such as earthquakes, and effects of these processes, such as faulting and folding are also examined. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

OS309 : Ocean Circulation & Prop of Seawater — An introduction to large scale ocean circulation, wind driven flow, tides and waves. This course also covers the seawater properties important to circulation, sound speed and light in the ocean. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

OS321 : Coastal Resource MGMT — This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the coastal environment, its resources and uses. In addition students will learn about federal, state and local coastal planning and management issues. The first part of the course examines the existing management framework. The latter half of the course focuses on specific coastal resource management issues such as coastal pollution, coastal hazards, ocean dumping, offshore oil development, fisheries management and marine and coastal protected areas. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

OS325 : Tropical Marine Science — An introduction to marine ecosystems in the tropics. Although marine science in the tropical setting will be broadly considered, emphasis will be on the biological and ecological aspects of tropical systems. The course will examine five tropical marine habitats in detail: coral reefs, sea grass beds, mangrove communities, intertidal beaches, and hypersaline habitats. Prerequisites: BI210 or BI220, OS101, OS203. Rec. 2, Lab. 3, Cr. 3.

OS400 : Prep for Research in Marine Science — This course introduces students to the details of conducting research in marine science and marine biology. Both theoretical and practical components of scientific research will be presented. Subsequently, students receive individual instruction in the development of their own research proposal. Prerequisites: Marine Biology majors: BI201, BI210, BI220, BI301, OS101 and OS203. Marine Science majors: BI210 or BI220, OC210, OS101, OS203, OS204, and OS212. Rec. 3, Lab 3, Cr. 4.

OS401 : Research Project — This course requires students to complete a self-designed study that results in an undergraduate thesis. This thesis can be an independent research project or a discrete component of an ongoing research program directed by a faculty member. Research projects may be conducted under the supervision of a researcher not associated with Maine Maritime Academy, but an Ocean Studies faculty member must serve as an internal sponsor and overseer of the project. Prerequisite: OS400. Rec. 3, Lab 3, Cr. 4.

OS499 : Special Topics in Ocean Studies — A course allowing students to pursue topics not normally offered in the curriculum, and may be any combination of lecture and laboratory. Departmental approval required. Cr. 1-3 as appropriate.

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT   (↑ Top ↑)

PD101 : Personal Development I — These courses focus on the fundamentals of personal leadership. Students will study characteristics of effective leadership, and the evolution of leadership behaviors. The course contains an introduction to leadership principles and examines the concept of leadership styles, traits, and types. Students will conduct assessments of their own unique set of leadership traits to identify strengths and weaknesses of their own styles and learn how to effectively employ their leadership abilities. Students will analyze leadership roles in the regiment and in the college’s student organizations to expand their leadership “tool bag” and to demonstrate that leadership is both an art and a science. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Each course is Rec. 1, Cr. 0.5.

PD102 : Personal Development I — These courses focus on the fundamentals of personal leadership. Students will study characteristics of effective leadership, and the evolution of leadership behaviors. The course contains an introduction to leadership principles and examines the concept of leadership styles, traits, and types. Students will conduct assessments of their own unique set of leadership traits to identify strengths and weaknesses of their own styles and learn how to effectively employ their leadership abilities. Students will analyze leadership roles in the regiment and in the college’s student organizations to expand their leadership “tool bag” and to demonstrate that leadership is both an art and a science. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Each course is Rec. 1, Cr. 0.5.

PD201 : Personal Development II — This course is designed to expose sophomore students to organizational leadership tenents and to assist them in their development of good positive leadership traits. The roles and responsibilities of a leader in the maritime environment are always changing, but one thing remains the same – behind every success in the maritime industry there is a leader who is willing to embrace and conquer challenges. The course will identify the different styles, techniques, and images of a successful leader while incorporating how to develop and fine tune students’ leadership skills. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Each course is Rec. 1, Cr. 0.5.

PD202 : Personal Development II — This course is designed to expose sophomore students to organizational leadership tenents and to assist them in their development of good positive leadership traits. The roles and responsibilities of a leader in the maritime environment are always changing, but one thing remains the same – behind every success in the maritime industry there is a leader who is willing to embrace and conquer challenges. The course will identify the different styles, techniques, and images of a successful leader while incorporating how to develop and fine tune students’ leadership skills. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Each course is Rec. 1, Cr. 0.5.

PD301 : Personal Development III — This is a cumulative program that builds on the two previous years of Personal Development that will incorporate discussion and application of leadership theories, critical thinking, and problem solving. Students will explore and develop a personal philosophy of leadership and then test that model in life situations encountered during operation of the training ship while under the supervision of the course moderators. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 0, Cr. 0.

PD302 : Personal Development III — This is a cumulative program that builds on the two previous years of Personal Development that will incorporate discussion and application of leadership theories, critical thinking, and problem solving. Students will explore and develop a personal philosophy of leadership and then test that model in life situations encountered during operation of the training ship while under the supervision of the course moderators. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 0, Cr. 0.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION   (↑ Top ↑)

PE100 : Basic Sailing — Nomenclature, terminology, and sailing techniques for Mercury class boats. Certification in Mercury class boats is possible upon completion of this course. Lab 3, Cr. 0.5

PE102 : Basic Water Skills – 2nd Half — Covers swimming skills such as stroke mechanics, breath control, diving, as well as drown proofing techniques and hypothermia. This course is ranked as “satisfactory” or “unsatisfactory” and is not computed in the student’s QPA. Lab 3, Cr. 0.5.

PE103 : Skin & Scuba Diving — Basic techniques in use of equipment. Covers safety procedures and physiological aspects of diving. Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) certification is available, but not mandatory, upon completion of established requirements. Prerequisite: Demonstration of swimming ability. Lab 3, Cr. 1.

PE104 : Tennis – 1st Half — Covers basic skills of serving, ground strokes, volley and overhand, as well as strategy, tennis customs and traditions, and rules of the game. Lab 3, Cr. 0.5.

PE105 : Racquetball -1st Half — Rules, court strategy, and various shot combinations. Grip, stance, ball control, and other fundamental techniques. Patterns of play for singles and doubles. Lab 3, Cr. 0.5.

PE107 : Wiffleball — Rules, Individual skills and how these skills are used in team play. This includes strategy, rules, and scoring. Lab 3, Cr. 0.5.

PE108 : Physical Fitness — The course enables the student to experience the various components of physical fitness, e.g., endurance, strength, ability, balance, flexibility, and speed. Theories on weight control are discussed. Opportunities to prepare oneself to meet the physical demands of daily life are presented. Lab 3, Cr. 0.5.

PE111 : Volleyball – 2nd Half — Individual skills and how these skills are used in team play. This includes strategy, rules, and scoring. Lab 3, Cr. 0.5.

PE113 : Lifeguard Training — This course is designed to teach lifeguard candidates the skills and knowledge needed to prevent and respond to aquatic emergencies. It offers instruction in accident prevention, water rescue skills, First Aid, and CPR. American Red Cross Lifeguard certification is available. Prerequisite: Demonstration of swimming ability. Lab 3, Cr. 1.

PE114 : Ocean Survival — A cold water safety and survival course to familiarize students with the planning and steps necessary to work, recreate, and supervise safety on or around cold water. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Lab 3, Cr. 0.5.

PE116 : Fitness:Relaxation Massage — Students will learn the basic techniques of therapeutic massage. 0.5 Cr.

PE119 : Flag Football — Students will learn the fundamentals and engage in play of flag football. 0.5 Cr.

PE120 : Contemporary Health Issues — The main course objective is to impart information about substance use and abuse that is correct and current; includes independent study. Rec. 3, Cr. 0.5.

PE124 : Floor Hockey — Students will learn the fundamentals and engage in play of floor hockey. 0.5 Cr.

PE130 : Special Topics in Physical Ed — This course allows students to pursue various topics in physical education that might not be offered regularly in the PE curriculum. Prerequisite: approval of Athletic Department Chair. Lab 3, Cr. 0.5.

PE200 : Intermediate Sailing — This half-semester course will follow PE100 Basic Sailing, and labs will be taught in Mercurys and sloops of up to 30 feet. Topics will include use of the spinnaker, precise maneuvering under sail and power, including mooring, anchoring and docking, and heavy weather sailing in sloops. A grade of A or B will earn the student a MMA Intermediate Sailing Certificate for sailing outside of classes. Prerequisite: a grade of A or B in PE100, or certification in Mercury sloops, or permission of the instructor. Lab 3, Cr. 0.5.

PE202 : Small Arms Certification — This is a certified course, which meets the Military Sealift Command (MSC) small arms training and live fire requirements. It is required annually for all mariners working aboard MSC or MSC contracted vessels, and emphasizes the safe and effective use of pistols, rifles and shotguns aboard vessels. This course will be conduct in the classroom and at the firing range in two consecutive weekends, to be determined based on weather conditions and range availability. All weapons and ammunition will be supplied by cost of lab fee. Cr. 1.

PE303 : Rescue Diver — The Rescue Diver course is specifically designed to train students in the dynamics of rescue management. Students develop their dive knowledge and skills to effectively perform diver rescues and assists, as well learn to manage diving accident situations and apply first aid skills. The Rescue Diver course is very much a hands on course, with role-playing to gain the experience needed for most dive incidents. Students learn to look beyond themselves and consider the safety and well being of other divers. Cr. 1

PE401 : Advanced Sail Vessel Handling — A follow-up course to Intermediate Sailing and Auxiliary Sail Vessel Operations. This course will give the student substantial vessel handling under sail on vessels 25-45′. Students will be challenged with advanced sailing maneuvers with and without the instructor on board. Participants will take part in activities focused around various career options available to professional sailors. Course work is comprised of weekly labs and sailing activities scheduled by the student outside of lab time. Prerequisite: PE200, NS341, or Maine Maritime Academy certification as skipper of 20-30 foot sloops. Lab 3, Cr. 1.

PE403 : Master Scuba Diver — The Master SCUBA Diver certification is the highest nonprofessional diver rating and shows superior achievement and experience. To reach this level the student must complete all levels of diver training including Rescue Diver and 5 specialty courses as well as a minimum of 50 logged dives. Each Specialty Course is a safe and supervised introduction to that area. Certain specialty courses, such as Enriched Air Nitrox and Wreck Diver, allow the student to participate in activities that are otherwise beyond their training, such as diving nitrox air mixtures and penetrating wrecks. Classroom sessions (Peak Performance Buoyancy, Drift, Night, Deep, Boat and Wreck) will be conducted to familiarize the student with the techniques, knowledge, planning, organization, potential hazards and safety skills for the various interest areas of diving. Each specialty dive area will also include up to 4 training dives. The Enriched Air Nitrox is a self-study Specialty. Students unable to pass the written certification exam will be provided additional classroom instruction. The Specialty dives will be conducted over the student’s spring break on the Caribbean island of Bonaire, Dutch Antilles. Cr. 2.

POLITICAL SCIENCE   (↑ Top ↑)

PO200 : American Government — A survey of the characteristics and functions of the American political system with emphasis on the origins and activities of the institutions of the American national government. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

PO230 : Contemp World Politics I — This course is an introductory survey of the field of international relations with an emphasis on the interaction of global political, social, and economic factors. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

PO330 : Contemp World Politics II — This upper level course allows students to pursue more in-depth study of particular areas of foreign relations. Topics might include modern development of Latin America, the Middle East, South Asia, the Pacific Rim or Western Europe. Prerequisite: PO230 or permission of the instructor. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

PHYSICS   (↑ Top ↑)

PS102 : Technical Physics I — An introductory college physics course without calculus. Emphasis is on Newtonian mechanics with problem solving using algebra, geometry and trigonometry. Lab work is included. Prerequisite: MS101 or MS102 with a grade of a C or better (MS103 concurrently). Rec. 3, Lab. 2, Cr. 4.

PS162 : Physics I — A calculus based physics course treating mechanics, energy, rotation, and simple harmonic motion. Prerequisite: MS120 or MS150 taken concurrently. Rec. 3, Lab. 2, Cr. 4.

PS201 : Technical Physics II — A continuation of PS102 with emphasis on electricity and magnetism. Other related topics as time permits. Prerequisite: PS102. Rec. 3, Lab. 2, Cr. 4.

PS220 : Special Topics in Physics — A course allowing students to pursue topics not normally offered in the curriculum. Proposals may be student initiated, in consultation with an instructor, and may be any combination of lecture and laboratory. Departmental approval required. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Cr. 1-3 as appropriate.

PS261 : Physics II — A continuation of PS162 with emphasis on electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, and radiation. Prerequisite: PS162 or permission of the instructor. It is recommended that MS160 be taken concurrently if not already taken. Rec. 3, Lab. 2, Cr. 4.

PS299 : Independent Study in Physics — A course allowing students to pursue advanced topics not normally offered in the curriculum. Proposals are student initiated in consultation with the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Cr. 1-3 as appropriate.

PS300 : Modern Physics — Modern physics introduces the student to the special theory of relativity, quantum mechanics, nuclear and elementary particle physics. It is a survey course with applications. Problem solving requires basic understanding of calculus and differential equations. Prerequisites: PS261 or PS201 and MS160. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

PS301 : Technical Physics III — A course devoted to the physics of waves, sound, fluids, heat transfer, and optics. The focus is on the mathematical description of such phenomena and problem solving will be emphasized in order to reinforce the concepts taught. Prerequisite: PS102. Rec. 3, Lab. 2, Cr. 4.

PSYCHOLOGY   (↑ Top ↑)

PY200 : Introduction To Psychology — This course provides an introduction to psychology – theories, research and practice. Emphasis will be on human behaviors, the brain, perception, principles of learning and therapies. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

PY210 : Human Relations and Group Dynamics — This course is designed to help students understand, critique, analyze and integrate the major theories, research and application of dyadic and small group processes. It will emphasize group effectiveness for completion of tasks and communication. Diversity, including gender, ethnicity and culture, will be examined. Status and power will be examined from both worker and supervisor perspectives. Students will participate in structured group activities in an environment that facilitates candid and authentic communication. Prerequisite: PY200. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

PY331 : Special Topics: Psychology — A course allowing students to pursue topics not normally offered in the curriculum. Proposals may be student initiated, in consultation with an instructor, and may be any combination of lecture and laboratory. Departmental approval required. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Cr. 1-3 as appropriate.

USCG COURSES   (↑ Top ↑)

USCG1 : USCG Fire Fighting — This course satisfies the USCG requirements for both basic and advanced firefighting as outlined in 46CFR 10, 46CFR 13, and as per STCW Table A-VI/3. Through both classroom instruction and practical training several topic areas are covered including: chemistry of fire, fire behavior and attacking a fire; use of fire extinguishers, protective equipment, and self-contained breathing apparatus are part of the training exercises. Shipboard firefighting training includes practical exercises in the operation of onboard firefighting equipment, fixed firefighting systems, search and rescue, emergency evacuation and engine room fires. Successful completion of both USCG1 and USCG2 are required by all students pursuing a USCG license. Rec. 1, Lab 2, Cr. 0

USCG2 : USCG Fire Fighting Live Burn — This course takes place at a live burn facility where students receive practical training in an actual live burn situation including entering a burning building and attacking a fire as part of a firefighting party. Successful completion of both USCG1 and USCG2 are required by all students pursuing a USCG license. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 0, Lab 2, Cr. 0.

USCG3 : Lifeboat Exam — A comprehensive 70 question multiple choice examination covering the topics of Lifeboats, Liferafts, Safety, and Survival at Sea. Maine Maritime Academy is authorized by the United States Coast Guard to administer this examination. This examination normally is scheduled early in the second semester of the student’s first year. Successful passing of the lifeboat examination is a prerequisite for CR103, First Year Cruise and a USCG requirement for obtaining a merchant mariner credential. Prerequisites: NS101. Cr. 0.

SMALL VESSEL OPERATIONS   (↑ Top ↑)

YO213 : Small Craft Design Cooperative Wk Exp — A minimum of 60 days of supervised work experience in the design, construction, or maintenance of small craft. This cooperative work experience is intended to provide the student with an entry level experience. Prerequisite: Completion of the first year of Small Craft Design program or approval of the SCD coordinator and drug free certification required. Cr. 2.



CHEMISTRY   (↑ Top ↑)

BIW CH101 : Chemistry — This course will emphasize the basic laws and theories of chemistry and their derivation from experimental evidence. It presents the qualitative and quantitative aspects of matter’s composition and changes and their unifying principles. It includes physical and chemical properties, periodicity of elements, stoichiometry, current atomic and bonding theories, laws and theories of physical states and changes of state, solution chemistry, and thermochemistry.
Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BIW CH102 : Chemistry Lab — Laboratory experiments to emphasize the empirical basis for the principles discussed in lecture and the proper gathering and interpretation of experimental data. Corequisite: CH101. Rec. 3, Lab 3, Cr. 1.

COMPUTER SCIENCE   (↑ Top ↑)

BIW CS150 : Structured Prob Solving with Computers — A course in problem solving using computers and emphasizing a structured approach. Topics include: structured solution methods, programming fundamentals, spreadsheet modeling, and an introduction to presentation software. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BIW CS201 : Introduction to Computing — This course is designed to introduce the student to personal computer use in a modern business environment. Emphasis is on skill development in a variety of applications, including word processing, spreadsheets, and relational databases, working in a local area network, and corporate systems. Rec. 4, Cr. 2.

ENGINEERING   (↑ Top ↑)

BIW EG102 : Introduction to Marine Engineering — A study of marine systems with emphasis on new construction. The course is designed to provide the student with an overview of marine systems and the techniques used to install, test and align these systems. A review of ship construction manufacturing technique is also covered. Rec. 3, Cr. 2.

BIW EG103 : Intro Nondestructive Exam Methods — This course will contain introductory information on the basis of nondestructive testing, including all aspects of visual inspection. This will include discussion of typical sources of material manufacturing discontinuities in raw stock, forgings, castings, tubing/pipe, as well as discontinuities due to grinding, heat treating, welding, and fatigue. This course will also provide training in the visual inspection process, including the basis of visual perception, equipment, and acceptance/rejection criteria. Rec. 2, Cr. 1.

BIW EG105 : Liq Penetrant & Mag Part Exam Methods — This course is designed to provide the necessary training required to perform liquid penetrant (PT) and magnetic particle (MT) testing on various base materials and weld configurations, and to then evaluate the results. Training in each method will be provided such that base material or weld discontinuities can be detected and then evaluated to determine if they are acceptable or unacceptable. Rec. 2, Cr. 1.

BIW EG106 : Confined Space Safety — This course will provide instruction in the various methods, processes, and concepts required to recognize, evaluate, and control confined space hazards. Students will understand the duties associated with the testing of confined spaces. Students will also recognize key uses and limitations of testing instrumentation. Cr. 1.

BIW EG120 : Mechanical Drawing I — An introduction to the basics of mechanical drawing, including equipment and general drawing techniques; geometric construction; multiview (orthographic) drawings; basic isometrics; section views; descriptive geometry; and auxiliary views. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BIW EG201 : Ultrasonic Test Methods — This course is designed to provide the necessary training required to perform ultrasonic testing (UT) on various base metals and weld configurations, and then to evaluate those results. Training will be provided on ultrasonic theory and instrument operation, with application to thickness gauging and flaw detection. Further training will be provided on interpreting data to determine discontinuity shape, identity and location, and then evaluating these results to determine acceptability. Cr. 2.

BIW EG203 : Radiographic Test Methods — This course is designed to provide the necessary training required to perform radiographic (RT) testing on various base materials and weld configurations, and to then evaluate the results. Radiological safety measures will be stressed (including state certification). Instruction will include the necessary inspection techniques, film handling, etc. to ensure adequate film contrast and clarity. Further instruction will be provided on interpreting, identifying, and evaluating radiographic film discontinuities. Rec. 2, Cr. 2.

BIW EG215 : Blueprint Reading Methods — A study of the sketches and blueprints used by the structural trades. Rec. 3, Cr. 1.

BIW EG216 : Sheet Metal Methods — A study of the blueprints and procedures used in the sheet metal trade. Rec. 3, Cr. 1.

BIW EG217 : Pipefitting Methods — A study of the blueprints and procedures used in the pipefitting trade. Rec. 3, Cr. 1.

BIW EG218 : Electrical Methods — A study of the blueprints and procedures used in the electrical trade. Rec. 3, Cr. 1.

BIW EG219 : Outside Machinist Methods — A study of the blueprints and procedures used in the outside machinist trade. Rec. 3, Cr. 2.

BIW EG240 : Welding Technology — A course designed to provide insight into the technical aspects of standard welding techniques and practices. It includes a review of material testing and the heat treatment of steel, BIW’s welding processes (SMAW, GTAW, GMAW, GMAW-P, FCAW, SAW), thermal cutting processes (Plasma, Laser, Oxy Fuel and Carbon Arc Gouging) weld procedures, procedure and welder qualification testing, joint designs, welding best practices, weld distortion control, and causes of weld defects. Rec. 2, Cr. 2.

BIW EG241 : Welding Symbols — Introduction to recognizing, reading, interpreting, and drawing welding symbols. Rec. 2, Cr. 1.

BIW EG250 : Mechanical Drawing II — A continuation of Mechanical Drawing I, including parallel and radial line developments as well as triangulation in the drawing of ventilation and piping systems. Practical ventilation, piping, and shipboard application problems are also studied. Prerequisite: BIW EG120. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BIW EG252 : Drawing Development and Technology — Students learn to create working drawing packages for the BIW producation trades. Topics include: Drawing formatting including determining best views for production, basic views and details, usage of callbacks and symbols, giveral notes pages, build requirements, dimensions and reference points, line weights and other functional drawing components, drawing types (fabrication, install, etc), tolerances and tolerance stacking and multi-discipline drawings. Other topics as time permits. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BIW EG255 : Machine Shop Theory I — A study of the tools, materials, machinery and technology used in the machine shop. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BIW EG280 : Electricity I — Introduction to the nature of electricity: resistance, current, voltage, Ohm’s law, network theorems, and AC. Rec. 3, Cr. 2.

BIW EG281 : Electricity II — A continuation of Basic Electricity, introduces inductive and capacitive circuits, meters and transformers. Prerequisite: BIW EG280. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BIW EG282 : Electricity III — Topics include construction and troubleshooting of AC and DC generators and motors. Prerequisite: BIW EG281. Rec. 3, Cr. 1.

BIW EG283 : Electricity IV — Topics include development and layout of motor control circuits and uses individual and team labs involving hot and de-energized motor control circuits. Prerequisite: BIW EG282. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BIW EG355 : Machine Shop Theory II — A study of the tools, materials, machinery and technology used in the machine shop. Prerequisite: BIW EG255. Rec. 3, Cr. 2.

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY   (↑ Top ↑)

BIW ET200 : Basic Electronics — Introduction to the nature of electronics, semi-conductor fundamentals, diodes, zener diodes, and their use in power supply and regulator circuits. Rec. 3, Cr. 2.

BIW ET206 : Mechanics I — The study of forces applied to structures. Introduces vector mechanics, static equilibrium, two and three dimensional force systems, distributed forces and friction, linear and angular kinematics, linear and angular kinetics, energy methods, impulse, momentum, kinetics of three-dimensional motions, and vibrations. Structures studied include plane and three-dimensional trusses, frames, beams, and cables. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BIW ET207 : Electronics II — A continuation of Basic Electronics, introduces bi-polar transistor operation and characteristics, field effect transistors, thyristors, and optoelectric devices. Prerequisite: BIW ET200. Rec. 3, Cr. 2.

BIW ET208 : Electronics III — Topics include digital concepts: number systems, semiconductor devices for digital circuits, integrated, digital integrated, and digital logical circuits. Boolean algebra and arithmetic circuits will be covered as time permits. Prerequisite: BIW ET207. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BIW ET209 : Electronics IV — Topics in counter circuits, shift registers, timers, analog interfacing, memories, microprocessors, fundamentals, and programmable logic controllers will be covered as time permits. Prerequisite: BIW ET208. Rec.3, Cr. 3.

BIW ET230 : Strength of Materials — Study of stresses and strains in structural members including tension, compression, shear, torsion, bending, and combined stresses. Stresses and strains in beams, columns, and indeterminate structure are also examined. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BIW ET235 : Material Properties and Testing — A foundation course designed to acquaint the student with the properties and testing procedures of today’s common industrial materials used in ship building. Materials science, application considerations, and analysis of properties of metals, polymers, wood, concrete, material coatings, ceramics and composites will be covered through classroom and laboratory activity. Students will study the destructive and non-destructive testing procedures performed to identify and determine mechanical, physical and other properties for specific industrial and ship building applications. Cr. 3.

BIW ET280 : Fundamentals of Marine Design I — An intensive introduction to marine design. Emphasis is placed on the application of the design processes used in the shipbuilding industry. Interactive group and individual instruction focuses on the importance of sound working relationships among the design disciplines. A Design Control Composite project leads to development of individual design-specific production drawings. The course is divided into three (3) modules. Module one (1) consists of several presentations of cross-discipline topics spanning about six (6) weeks. Module two (2) is comprised of approximately 23 weeks of discipline specific topics. Module three (3) is an application exercise where the students do actual work on a class project. Rec. 2, Cr. 2.

BIW ET282 : Design Practices — The goal of this course is to give students the skills required to make sound decisions when developing any design. Emphasis will be on concept development while considering manufacturing processes, cost, material selection, standardization, design evaluation and prototype development. Students will also develop skills and become familiar with types of tradeoffs required in a fast track design environment. Prerequisites: BIW EG252. Rec. 2, Cr. 2.

BIW ET283 : Intro to Marine Design — This Marine Design course presents topics required for understanding ship design at an introductory level, including buoyancy, stability, materials of manufacture, and inter-related systems. Students will be introduced to maritime vocabulary as they develop an understanding of the basic requirements of design and an appreciation for systems engineering principles. The course will cover maritime history, forces on a ship, design for manufacture concepts, and the basic physics, geometry and algebra concepts upon which ship design is based. Students will tour a working shipyard, if possible. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BIW ET306 : Mechanics II — The study of forces applied to structures. Introduces vector mechanics, static equilibrium, two and three dimensional force systems, distributed forces and friction, linear and angular kinematics, linear and angular kinetics, energy methods, impulse, momentum, kinetics of three-dimensional motions, and vibrations. Structures studied include plane and three-dimensional trusses, frames, beams, and cables. Prerequisite: BIW ET206. Rec. 3, Cr. 2.

BIW ET380 : Fundamentals of Marine Design II — An intensive introduction to marine design. Emphasis is placed on the application of the design processes used in the shipbuilding industry. Interactive group and individual instruction focuses on the importance of sound working relationships among the design disciplines. A Design Control Composite project leads to development of individual design-specific production drawings. The course is divided into three (3) modules. Module one (1) consists of several presentations of cross-discipline topics spanning about six (6) weeks. Module two (2) is comprised of approximately 23 weeks of discipline specific topics. Module three (3) is an application exercise where the students do actual work on a class project. Prerequisite: BIW ET280. Rec. 2, Cr. 2.

BIW ET383 : Marine Design II — This Intermediate Marine Design course presents topics required for understanding ship design at an intermediate level and concentrates on detailed design for specific area and disciplines within the shipbuilding disciplines. Students will expand their understanding of the taxonomy and vocabulary of the marine industry especially as it pertains to certain disciplines within the shipbuilding industry. Students will develop an intermediate understanding for the requirements of design and an appreciation for systems engineering principles at a detailed level. The course will cover maritime history as it pertains to the review of case studies which examine the need for requirements and standards and the consequences that occur when those requirements are not met. Students will be introduced to the detailed shipbuilding design discipline data they need to have a working knowledge of for ships systems design including electrical, structural, piping, machinery, HVAC, and hull outfitting with due consideration for safety, human factors, and environmental control requirements. Students will complete a final project that they will present, which combines this working knowledge with a requirements bounded design solution for a ship design that accounts for dynamic forces on a ship, and design for manufacture concepts. Class room analytical work will include concepts involving basic physics, geometry and algebra. Students will tour a working shipyard if possible. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

HUMANITIES & COMMUNICATION   (↑ Top ↑)

BIW HC110 : Business Communications — Students apply basic writing skills to produce various types of business communications with a focus on technical reports, proposals and procedures. Students will also present reports orally with visual aids. Students will produce resumes and letters of application. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BIW HC113 : Oral Communication Skills — Deals with the basics of business and professional communications, personal skills, working in groups and making effective presentations. Students will study methods of problem solving, managing conflict and conducting effective meetings through lecture and extemporaneous exercises. Students will also develop and make presentations of various lengths to selected audiences. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

MANAGEMENT   (↑ Top ↑)

BIW MA200 : Labor History — The history of the organized labor movement in the United States and Canada. Includes the colonial period through the twentieth century. An introduction to the precepts of labor law and collective bargaining. Particular attention will be paid to the history of labor in Maine, the shipbuilding industry, and Bath Iron Works. Rec. 3, Cr. 2.

BIW MA230 : Organizational Behavior — Emphasis is developing a grasp of issues and problems associated with human behavior at work. Specific topics include leadership, motivation, teamwork, conflict management, goal setting, job enrichment, time and stress management and communication styles. Rec 3, Cr. 3.

MATHEMATICS   (↑ Top ↑)

BIW MS105 : Mathematics I — This course is designed to provide a foundation of mathematic skills necessary for the applied technical courses which follow. Areas of study include a review of basic algebra; solving equations and word problems; geometry; trig functions, right triangles and vectors; and factors and factoring. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

BIW MS205 : Mathematics II — A continuation of Mathematics I, including the study of fractions and fractional equations; systems of linear equations; exponents and radicals; quadratic equations; oblique triangles; and radian measure. Prerequisite: BIW MS105. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NAVAL ARCHITECTURE   (↑ Top ↑)

BIW NA151 : Ship Building Process — A study of the principles of naval architecture and their application to modern vessels and the building methods and processes used at BIW. Topics include shipbuilding history, yard layout and construction stages, ship design and dimensions, structure, fabrication, pre-outfit, materials, ship stresses and welding, manufacturing engineering, hull integration, launching, sea trials and ship shock trials. Rec. 4, Cr. 4.

PHYSICS   (↑ Top ↑)

BIW PS103 : Physics I — An introductory college physics course sequence without calculus. Emphasis on Newtonian mechanics of rigid bodies, fluids, heat and introductory thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism. Other related topics as time permits. Rec. 3 and 3, Cr. 3 and 3.

BIW PS203 : Physics II — An introductory college physics course sequence without calculus. Emphasis on Newtonian mechanics of rigid bodies, fluids, heat and introductory thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism. Other related topics as time permits. Rec. 3 and 3, Cr. 3 and 3.



THE LANDING SCHOOL COURSES

The following courses are taught at The Landing School in Kennebunkport, Maine, and are available only to students enrolled in the Small Craft Design and Small Vessel Systems majors.


TOPICS IN DESIGN   (↑ Top ↑)

LS DSN111 : Design I — This course covers subjects concerned with the overall design of small craft such as design methodologies, lines plans, parametric studies, weights and centers calculations, deck and cockpit geometry, ergonomics, general arrangements and deck layouts. Aesthetics are also considered. Much of the learning in this course is centered on practical design projects. 3.5 CR

LS DSN112 : Naval Architecture — This course covers subjects concerned with the technical design of small craft such as calculation of area and volumetric properties, hydrostatics and stability, hull form design, basic hydrodynamics, resistance and propulsion. Displacement and semi-displacement and planing boats are considered. 3.5 Cr.

LS DSN113 : Marine Engineering — This course covers small craft system design and installation issues for such elements as ventilation, machinery, tanks, plumbing and electrical systems. Small scale individual case studies in the early part of the course are followed by the complete system installation design for the same sail boat design project used in DSN111 and DSN112. 4 Cr.

LS DSN114 : Structural Design — This course covers statics, applied mechanics, strength of materials, structural mechanics and basic composite theory and their application to such problems in yacht design. These theoretical subjects also provide an essential foundation for the scantling and structural design studies in the construction course, DSN 214. 3.5 Cr.

LS DSN115 : Drafting and CAD I — This course begins with the basics of sketching, technical drawing by hand, and traditional tools of the trade. We then cover computer aided design (CAD) and drafting. Hull surface modeling, 3-D design and 2-D drafting as well as spreadsheet calculations are covered in detail. The primary software packages used are “Orca3d’, “Rhino”, “AutoCAD”, “Excel” and “Word.” No prior experience with these packages is required or assumed. 2.5 Cr.

LS DSN116 : Design Topics I — This course covers a variety of subject areas that are important to a small craft designer’s education but that do not fit appropriately into one of the other modules. Subjects include use of computer office tools such as spreadsheets and word processors, and project management skills. Also included are a series of industry enhancement elements such as guest speakers from the industry and visits to relevant facilities and events. 1.5 Cr.

LS DSN117 : Marine Engineering – Mechanical — This course covers small craft system design and installation issues for propulsion machinery, ventilation, tanks, plumbing, and air conditioning systems. Small scale case studies in the early part of the course are followed by complete system installation designs for the boat design project(s) used in DSN111 & DSN112. 3.5 CR.

LS DSN118 : Marine Engineering – Electrical — This course covers the design and installation of small craft electrical systems. Subjects include: the characteristics and behavior of electrical systems; the types of marine batteries and their charging/discharging characteristics; the design of a DC electrical system, including preparing a suitable schematic; identifying AC power sources and describing their function; designing an AC electrical system and preparing a suitable schematic; designing a start/charge circuit and preparing a suitable schematic; describing the process of galvanic corrosion and identifying the components of bonding and lightning protection systems; describing the function of basic marine electronics and understanding their installation requirements. 2.5 CR

LS DSN211 : Design II — This course builds on, and further develops, the subjects introduced in DSN111. Regulatory requirements for commercial vessels and larger yachts are also considered. The design of an aluminum planing Pilot boat is the focus DSN211. 3 Cr.

LS DSN212 : Naval Architecture II — This course builds on, and further develops, the subjects introduced in DSN112. Additional subjects include: planning hulls; propeller nomenclature and selection; sub-division and flooding considerations; regulatory requirements for commercial vessels and larger yachts. 3 Cr.

LS DSN214 : Construction — This course applies the theoretical concepts studied in DSN114 to the structural design of metal and composite boats and their component parts. The course covers the derivation of composite scantlings to match the ISO standards, as well as the design of the scantlings and other construction details (such as the engine beds) for the aluminum Pilot boat. 3 Cr.

LS DSN215 : CAD II — This course continues the study and application of computer aided design (CAD) and drafting software started in DSN115, focusing on hull form definition (FastShip) and vessel rendering (Rhino). 2 Cr.

LS DSN216 : Design Topics II — This course continues the discussion of topics of importance to a small craft designer started in DSN116 including variations in design approaches, design office practices and client and customer relationships. 1.5 Cr.

LS DSN218 : Design Project — The second half of the second semester is largely devoted to an individual Design Project. This involves the preliminary study design of a sea-going boat built of composite materials to industry or classification standards for offshore or ocean use. The boat may be power or sail but the waterline length has to be between 27 and 40 feet and there has to be accommodation for four adults. The purpose of this project is to allow the student bring together all the knowledge and skills learnt in the earlier part of the program and to demonstrate that they can use these to produce a safe, technically sound, appropriate and attractive boat to match the design brief they have developed. The results of the project also form a significant portfolio to assist the student as he/she seeks employment. 3 Cr.

LS DSN219 : Powerboat Design — This course builds on, and further develops, the subjects introduced in DSN 111 and DSN112. This course expands the learning topics from those courses into more specific Yacht Design and Naval Architecture subject matter specific to powerboats. Specific topics will include powering and range prediction, planning hull design and behavior characteristics, as well as design issues unique to powerboats. 3 CR.

LS DSN220 : Sailboat Design — This course builds on, and further develops, the subjects introduced in DSN 111 and DSN112. This course expands the learning topics from those courses into more specific Yacht Design and Naval Architecture subject matter specific to sailing yachts. Topics will include sailing performance, stability, and seaworthiness, deck arrangements as they relate to sailing techniques, sailboat construction and details, including rig, keel and rudder design. 3 CR.

TOPICS IN SYSTEMS   (↑ Top ↑)

LS MST120 : Shop Methods/Materials — The purpose of this course is to introduce practices, methods and materials used in small vessel maintenance and repairs including: use of measurement tools; cutting, drilling and filing metals; fastener identification and selection; use of taps and dies; PVC fabrication; soldering; selecting caulks, sealants and adhesives; estimating areas and volume; identifying and selecting hoses. This course is augmented by several specific labs. 3.5 Cr.

LS MST121 : Composite Repair — The purpose of this course is to introduce theory, identification, selection, properties and use of composite materials including resins, reinforcements, fillers and core materials. This course includes hands-on fabrication and repair of both single skin and cored composite panels. This course is augmented by several specific labs. 1.5 Cr.

LS MST122 : Propulsion I — The purpose of this course is to introduce the internal combustion engine and related systems including: engine architecture; valve train; performance data; lubrication systems and lube oils; exhaust systems; cooling systems and engine winterizing or long term storage techniques. This course is augmented by several specific labs. 4 Cr.

LS MST123 : Propulsion II — The purpose of this course is to continue study of the internal combustion engine to include: gasoline engine fuel and ignition systems; diesel fuel systems including fuel injectors, injection pumps and forced induction; marine gear and related drive train components; propellers; shafting and struts; noise and vibration remediation; engine ventilation; outboards and sterndrives. Labs include ignition timing, fuel injector testing, bleeding diesel fuel systems, marine gear disassembly and inspection, ignition timing and valve adjustment. 5.5 Cr.

LS MST124 : DC Electrical — The purpose of this course is to study electrical theory, Ohm’s Law, circuit identification and analysis, schematics and symbols, batteries, conductor selection and identification, American Boat and Yacht Council (ABYC) standards, over-current protection, system loads and distribution panels. Students will also cover solenoids and relays, DC motors and starters, engine instruments, battery charging techniques (including wind and solar), corrosion, cathodic protection and lightning. Hands-on labs will include, stripping and crimping wire, electrical soldering, use of multimeters, build a DC electrical system, disassembly and testing of alternators. 4 Cr.

LS MST226 : Marine Plumbing — The purpose of this course is to cover operation, installation and maintenance of seacocks; selection, installation and maintenance of pumps; raw water systems (bilge, washdown, scuppers and drains, live wells and bait wells); potable water systems and blackwater systems. The course includes a review of the overboard discharge regulations and health/hygiene considerations. Labs will include seacock installation, building a bilge pump system and potable water system. 3 Cr.

LS MST227 : Marine Electronics — The purpose of this course is to cover the theory, operation and installation of marine electronics including speedometers, depth finders, wind instruments, VHF and single sideband radios, radar, GPS and chart plotters. Proprietary and standard electronic networking systems such as NMEA 0183 and NMEA 2000 will be introduced. Lab will include the proper termination of a UHF connector. 1.5 Cr.

LS MST228 : Mechanical Special Topics — The purpose of this course is to cover selection and installation of windlasses and ground tackle; selection and installation of bow thrusters; mechanical and hydraulic steering; trim tab; CNG and LPG systems. Sail handling systems such as deck hardware, reefing and furling equipment as well as standing and running rigging will also be covered. Lab will include building a hydraulic steering station, building a working trim tab installation and properly terminating a Norseman style rigging fitting. 2.5 Cr.

LS MST229 : AC Electricity I — The purpose of this course is to cover AC electrical theory, alternators, applicable ABYC standards, shore power systems, over-current protection, ground fault circuits, galvanic isolators, transformers and generators and inverters. Students will reconfigure generators for various outputs as well as troubleshooting techniques and disassemble and test alternators. Students will also design and estimate a small vessel generator installation. Lab will be to design and construct a working AC electrical system. 3 Cr.

LS MST230 : Marine Refrigeration & A/C — The purpose of this course is to covers theory, design and installation of marine refrigeration and air conditioning systems. The course includes principles of temperature and heat, heat transfer and changes of state; the refrigeration cycle; BTU and airflow requirements; refrigerants and federal regulations controlling their use; air conditioning installations; service valves and gauges; AC and DC refrigeration systems, hermetic refrigeration systems and EPA regulations. Labs will include evacuation and recharging of system refrigerant, as well as use of gauges and the service valve. 2 Cr.

LS MST231 : Project Boat — The purpose of this course is to provide an application of the principles and techniques learned throughout the program. Students work in teams to refit and repair a small vessel. Specific tasks vary with the vessel, but generally include the design and replacement of the following systems: propulsion and related systems(fuel, exhaust, controls etc.); electrical; potable water; bilge pumps and sanitation. 6.5 Cr.