Curricula

  • M.S. in International Logistics Management
  • M.S. in Maritime Management

M.S. in International Logistics Management

  • Thirty-six credit hours must be successfully completed to earn a M.S. in International Logistics Management. These credit hours are earned by taking nine, four credit hour courses.
  • At least one course will be available each trimester.
  • No more than two courses may be taken per trimester.

Each graduate level course is four (4) credit hours. The courses are as follows:

BA642 – Accounting & Finance for Logistics Professionals
BA644 – Economics of Transportation & Logistics
BA645 – Managing Organization Development & Change in the Supply Chain
BA646 – Fundamentals of International Logistics
BA647 – Strategic Marketing for Global Supply Chain Managers
BA648 – Integrated International Logistics
BA651 – Port & Transport Terminal Operations in Global Logistics
BA652 – Production & Operations Management for Manufacturing & Heavy Industry
BA660 Strategic Supply Chain Management. Capstone course. A grade of B minus or better is required.
BA661 – Special Topics in ILM – if needed

Academic Standards

A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (a “B” average) on the 4.0 scale must be achieved to qualify for the Master of Science in International Logistics Management and the Maritime Management degree. Students whose average falls below 3.0, who receive a grade of “F”, or who earn two or more grades of “C” will be reviewed by the Graduate Faculty Student Review Committee to determine the conditions under which they may be permitted to continue as degree candidates. In addition, graduate students must earn a course grade of a B minus (B-) or better in BA660 to successfully complete the graduate program.

Course Descriptions:

BA642 | Accounting & Finance for Logistics Professionals: This course will address Accounting and Finance and their use in business situations by operational managers. Students will gain an understanding of the basic principles of accounting and finance. Students will apply their knowledge to real world logistics case studies. Financial statement analysis, internal control, inventory control and metrics, currency valuations, organizational and capital budgeting, internal cost allocations, methods of controlling geographically and organizationally diverse business units, financial ratios, working capital management, debt and equity financing, and other accounting and finance concepts will be addressed. The course will include lectures, case studies, and financial analysis projects. Graduate Credit Hours-4

BA644 | Economics of Transportation and Logistics: An applied course in economics that deals with the allocation of scarce resources within the entire supply chain process, with an emphasis on the transportation industry. Topics include: the theory of the firm, forecasting demand, market structure, and government regulations. Additional topics include role of transportation and logistics in the growth of world trade, tariffs, quotas, international payments, exchange rate determination, and hedging foreign exchange risk. Graduate Credit Hours-4

BA645 | Managing Organization Development and Change in the Supply Chain: This course targets supply chain professionals who aim to develop organizational assessment, intervention, and design skills that are vital in an era of mergers, acquisitions, and consolidations. Students consider the relationship of organizational design to organizational effectiveness, the challenges of strategy formulation, cross-cultural and national influences on organizational behavior and culture, implications of change to organizational and workforce development, and the role of leadership in the 21st century through business partnerships and casework that includes logistics, maritime management, and operations examples. Graduate Credit Hours-4

BA646 | Fundamentals of Logistics: This course addresses the fundamental logistics concepts and applications of moving commodities, parts, and products (inventory) as well as reverse logistics. Within the framework of supply chain management the fundamentals course focuses on the physical movement of inventory within and through warehouses as well as the in transit inventory in freight transportation modes and processes, freight transportation being the largest spend in logistics. Also covered are the information, financial transaction, administration/documentation, and basic inventory analysis tools associated with the physical movement of inventory. Graduate Credit Hours-4

BA647 | Strategic Marketing for Global Supply Chain Managers: This course will focus on the application of strategic marketing management principles in international business organizations. Specific attention will be given to the importance of supply chain optimization to overall marketing strategy. Students will study the relationship of marketing to organizational strategy formulation, brand management, business-to-business relationships, business-to- consumer opportunities, and contemporary logistics challenges. Course will include lectures, case studies and group projects. Graduate Credit Hours-4

BA648 | Integrated International Logistics: This course will examine how integrated international logistics applications and decisions are made which will have an impact on functional areas of an organization trying to achieve efficiency and effectiveness throughout the supply chain. Discussions revolving around export-import strategy, multinational logistics strategy, FTZ’s, classification of products, Incoterms, international payment processes, review of transportation modes, and resiliency will be reviewed. The effects of government trade and public policies on global logistics operations will also be analyzed. This course will utilize a variety of teaching methods such as case studies to ingrain logistics concepts in a more applied manner. Graduate Credit Hours-4

BA651 | Port & Transport Terminal Operations in Global Logistics: This course will examine the roles of ports in international logistics; an in-depth study of transport terminals and their operations including terminals for ocean container; bulk; break-bulk; rail intermodal; rail carload; package; and inland water. Graduate Credit Hours-4

BA652 | Production & Operations Management for Manufacturing & Heavy Industry: This course introduces production/operations management used in manufacturing and heavy industry with emphasis on the heavy, shipbuilding and general manufacturing industry. The focus of the course is on operations in manufacturing and some topics it will cover are integrated design, program management, process selection and analysis, lean operations, quality systems, total quality management, facilities management, capacity planning and project planning and scheduling. Graduate Credit Hours-4

BA660 | Strategic Supply Chain Management: This course is designed as a capstone course in which students learn and apply various models and tools to formulate a business strategy. Students must earn a course grade of a B minus (B-) or better in BA660 to successfully complete the graduate program. The students will learn and apply the process of situational analysis including the macro- environment, industry environment, and internal situation of the firm. This analysis will be used to create alternative strategies and determine the optimal strategy to be implemented. The course also examines the processes and issues to implement the selected strategy. Essentially, this course will take many of the concepts learned in previous graduate courses and apply them here. This course will go beyond the traditional pedagogy and explore actual strategic decision making and business development planning. Graduate Credit Hours-4

*BA661 Special Topics in ILM – as needed – not required. Graduate Credit Hours- 1- 4


M.S. in Maritime Management with Small Vessel Operations

A total of 78 credit hours

36 credit hours; graduate level courses; online
42 credit hours; undergraduate courses; on campus

Graduate Courses

  • Thirty-six credit hours must be successfully completed to earn a M.S. in International Logistics Management. These credit hours are earned by taking nine, four credit hour courses.
  • At least one course will be available each trimester.
  • No more than two courses may be taken per trimester.

Academic Standards

A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (a “B” average) on the 4.0 scale must be achieved to qualify for the Master of Science in International Logistics Management and the Maritime Management degree. Students whose average falls below 3.0, who receive a grade of “F”, or who earn two or more grades of “C” will be reviewed by the Graduate Faculty Student Review Committee to determine the conditions under which they may be permitted to continue as degree candidates. In addition, graduate students must earn a course grade of a B minus (B-) or better in BA660 to successfully complete the graduate program.

Each graduate level course is four (4) credit hours. The courses are as follows:

BA642   – Accounting & Finance for Logistics Professionals
BA644   – Economics of Transportation & Logistics
BA645   – Managing Organization Development & Change in the Supply Chain
BA646   – Fundamentals of International Logistics
BA647   – Strategic Marketing for Global Supply Chain Managers
BA648   – Integrated International Logistics
BA651   – Port & Transport Terminal Operations in Global Logistics
BA652   – Production & Operations Management for Manufacturing & Heavy Industry
BA660   Strategic Supply Chain Management. Capstone course. A grade of B minus or better is required.
BA661   – Special Topics in ILM – if needed

Course Descriptions:

BA642 | Accounting & Finance for Logistics Professionals: This course will address Accounting and Finance and their use in business situations by operational managers. Students will gain an understanding of the basic principles of accounting and finance. Students will apply their knowledge to real world logistics case studies. Financial statement analysis, internal control, inventory control and metrics, currency valuations, organizational and capital budgeting, internal cost allocations, methods of controlling geographically and organizationally diverse business units, financial ratios, working capital management, debt and equity financing, and other accounting and finance concepts will be addressed. The course will include lectures, case studies, and financial analysis projects. Graduate Credit Hours-4

BA644 | Economics of Transportation and Logistics: An applied course in economics that deals with the allocation of scarce resources within the entire supply chain process, with an emphasis on the transportation industry. Topics include: the theory of the firm, forecasting demand, market structure, and government regulations. Additional topics include role of transportation and logistics in the growth of world trade, tariffs, quotas, international payments, exchange rate determination, and hedging foreign exchange risk. Graduate Credit Hours-4

BA645 | Managing Organization Development and Change in the Supply Chain: This course targets supply chain professionals who aim to develop organizational assessment, intervention, and design skills that are vital in an era of mergers, acquisitions, and consolidations. Students consider the relationship of organizational design to organizational effectiveness, the challenges of strategy formulation, cross-cultural and national influences on organizational behavior and culture, implications of change to organizational and workforce development, and the role of leadership in the 21st century through business partnerships and casework that includes logistics, maritime management, and operations examples. Graduate Credit Hours-4

BA646 | Fundamentals of Logistics: This course addresses the fundamental logistics concepts and applications of moving commodities, parts, and products (inventory) as well as reverse logistics. Within the framework of supply chain management the fundamentals course focuses on the physical movement of inventory within and through warehouses as well as the in transit inventory in freight transportation modes and processes, freight transportation being the largest spend in logistics. Also covered are the information, financial transaction, administration/documentation, and basic inventory analysis tools associated with the physical movement of inventory. Graduate Credit Hours-4

BA647 | Strategic Marketing for Global Supply Chain Managers: This course will focus on the application of strategic marketing management principles in international business organizations. Specific attention will be given to the importance of supply chain optimization to overall marketing strategy. Students will study the relationship of marketing to organizational strategy formulation, brand management, business-to-business relationships, business-to- consumer opportunities, and contemporary logistics challenges. Course will include lectures, case studies and group projects. Graduate Credit Hours-4

BA648 | Integrated International Logistics: This course will examine how integrated international logistics applications and decisions are made which will have an impact on functional areas of an organization trying to achieve efficiency and effectiveness throughout the supply chain. Discussions revolving around export-import strategy, multinational logistics strategy, FTZ’s, classification of products, Incoterms, international payment processes, review of transportation modes, and resiliency will be reviewed. The effects of government trade and public policies on global logistics operations will also be analyzed. This course will utilize a variety of teaching methods such as case studies to ingrain logistics concepts in a more applied manner. Graduate Credit Hours-4

BA651 | Port & Transport Terminal Operations in Global Logistics: This course will examine the roles of ports in international logistics; an in-depth study of transport terminals and their operations including terminals for ocean container; bulk; break-bulk; rail intermodal; rail carload; package; and inland water. Graduate Credit Hours-4

BA652 | Production & Operations Management for Manufacturing & Heavy Industry: This course introduces production/operations management used in manufacturing and heavy industry with emphasis on the heavy, shipbuilding and general manufacturing industry. The focus of the course is on operations in manufacturing and some topics it will cover are integrated design, program management, process selection and analysis, lean operations, quality systems, total quality management, facilities management, capacity planning and project planning and scheduling. Graduate Credit Hours-4

BA660 | Strategic Supply Chain Management: This course is designed as a capstone course in which students learn and apply various models and tools to formulate a business strategy. Students must earn a course grade of a B minus (B-) or better in BA660 to successfully complete the graduate program The students will learn and apply the process of situational analysis including the macro- environment, industry environment, and internal situation of the firm. This analysis will be used to create alternative strategies and determine the optimal strategy to be implemented. The course also examines the processes and issues to implement the selected strategy. Essentially, this course will take many of the concepts learned in previous graduate courses and apply them here. This course will go beyond the traditional pedagogy and explore actual strategic decision making and business development planning. Graduate Credit Hours-4

*BA661 Special Topics in ILM – as needed – not required. Graduate Credit Hours- 1- 4


Small Vessel Operations

Undergraduate Courses

  • 42 credit hours must be completed to successfully completed to earn the SVO degree
  • An off-site field experience aboard an appropriate vessel during the summer between Year 1 and Year 2 is required
  • Program completed in 2 calendar years

Course Descriptions

Fall First Year – 11 Credit Hours

NS101: Introduction to Nautical Science  An introduction to nautical science which covers basic skills that would put the student at the able bodied seaman level of knowledge and prepare the student for the U.S. Coast Guard lifeboat examination. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 2

NS103: Introduction to Vessel Operations  This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of the Small Vessel Operations. It is designed to run concurrently with NS 101 and augment the seamanship skills taught in that class. The curriculum includes basic nomenclature, small vessel propulsion and handling, safety and regulations pertinent to the Small Vessel industry. The lab portion of the course is taught by the Waterfront Staff and will provide students with the opportunity to put classroom concepts into safe practice aboard vessels on the water. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 2, Lab 2, Cr. 2.

NS132: Small Craft Technology   Introduction to the fundamentals of the engine and drivetrain typically found aboard small craft. Emphasis is on the high-speed marine diesel engine, the theory of its operation and the understanding of its associated components. Fuel, air, lubrication, and cooling systems are covered. The lab includes the disassembly, inspection, re-assembly and running of a small diesel engine. Rec. 2, Lab. 3, Cr. 3.

NS135: Small Craft Construction  An introduction to the fundamentals of building small craft. While the major focus will be on wooden boat plans and construction, the course will also cover steel, aluminum and fiberglass construction methods. Vessel construction terminology, the process of lofting, and scantling requirements are discussed. The lab is focused on the building of a 14-foot flat bottomed wooden skiff. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3

PE100: Basic Sailing  Nomenclature, terminology, and sailing techniques for Mercury class boats. Certification in Mercury class boats is possible upon completion of this course. Lab 3, Cr. 0.5

PE114: Ocean Survival  A cold water safety and survival course to familiarize students with the planning and steps necessary to work, recreate, and supervise safety on or around cold water. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Lab 3, Cr. 0.5.

USCG1: Fire Fighting This course satisfies the USCG requirement for both basic and advanced firefighting as outlined in 46FR 10, 46CFR 13, and as per SCTW Table A-VI/3. Successful completion of both USCG1 and USCG2 is required by all students pursuing a USCG license. Rec. 1, Lab 2, Cr. 0

Spring First Year – Total Credits 8

OC101: Introduction to Ocean Science  An introduction to the concepts of physical, geological, chemical, and biological ocean science. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3.

NS221: Meteorology  Basic concepts of meteorology with particular emphasis on marine applications. This includes a study of ocean winds and weather with the plotting and analysis of weather maps, weather routing of ships, and familiarization with the various Weather Bureau publications and services. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NS241: Seamanship Seamanship refers to a body of practical knowledge that is essential to creative solutions at sea, as well as to routine shipboard operations. Through labs and lectures the student will be acquainted with the information and practical skills associated with rigging, mechanical advantage, deck equipment, hardware, maintenance, and line handling and safety procedures. The course includes material appropriate to functioning as an Able Bodied Seaman, as well as to efficiently organizing the work of others. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisite: NS101. Rec. 2, Lab 2, Cr. 2.

USCG2 Fire Fighting Live Burn: This course takes place at a live burn facility where students receive practical training in an actual live burn situation including entering a burning building and attacking a fire as part of a fire fighting party. Successful completion of both USCG1 and USCG2 is required by all students pursuing a USCG license. Rec. 0, Lab 2, Cr. 0

Summer First Year – Total Credits 3

CO223 : SVO/VOT Cooperative Work Exp I A minimum of 60 days of supervised work experience aboard an appropriate vessel. This cooperative work experience is intended to provide the student with an entry level deck position for training and sea service days toward a USCG 200 GT Mate/Near Coastal license. Students are encouraged to pursue vessel opportunities aligned with their particular interests. An extensive written sea project is required. (A total of 120 qualifying sea service days are required for the USCG 200 GT Mate/Near Coastal license). Prerequisite: HC111, NS101, NS103, PE114, NS132, NS135, NS241, USCG1 and USCG2 or approval of the SVO/VOT coordinator and drug free certification required; pass the USCG Lifeboatman Exam. Cr. 3.

Fall Second Year – Total Credits 10

NS122: Cargo I  A study of vessel cargo and the role of the ship in integrated transportation systems. At the introductory level topics include cargo responsibility, fundamental objectives of good stowage, and a survey of cargo gear. The role of the ship’s officer is examined and related to various types of vessels and cargo operations. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NS232: Marine Systems & Lab Electrical and mechanical system fundamentals, associated with yachts and small commercial vessels, are examined. These include: DC electrical theory and installation standards, storage batteries, multi-meter use, AC electricity, pumping systems, refrigeration, reverse-osmosis water makers and hydraulics, ABYC standards and CFR requirements are covered. The lab explores DC circuits, wiring standards, systems operation, installation and maintenance. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisite: NS132. Rec. 2, Lab 2, Cr. 3.

NS271: Terrestrial Navigation I  An introductory navigation course intended for all students pursuing a license for any tonnage class. The rudiments of navigation are covered in lecture format. Topics include: charts, plotting tools and techniques, dead reckoning, gyro and magnetic compasses and their errors, fixes and running fixes, set and drift, tidal and current calculations, navigation publications, and chart correcting and piloting with electronic navigation instruments. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Rec. 3, Cr. 3.

NS272: Terrestrial Navigation Lab  Weekly exercises aboard Academy watercraft and in the Academy’s Bridge and Navigation Simulator allow the student to practice the skills taught in NS271. This course supports the marine license program requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). The course may have embedded assessment requirements that must be completed in addition to the class requirements. Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with NS271. Lab 3, Cr. 1.

Spring Second Year- Total Credits 10

NS262: Navigation Rules  The International and Inland Rules of the Road for preventing collisions at sea. This includes application, definitions, lights and shapes, steering and sailing rules with sound signals for vessels in meeting, crossing, and overtaking situations, and conduct of vessels in restricted visibility. Rec. 3, Cr. 3

NS292: Electronic Navigation  Introduction to Electronic Navigation. Instruction covers the theory and practical application of electromagnetic and acoustic wave propagation as it pertains to modern electronic navigation equipment. Systems discussed include but are not limited to Marine RADAR, Marine Compass, Echo Sounders, Speed Logs, Satellite Navigation Systems, Marine Communication Systems, Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) and Electronic Chart Display and Information System (ECDIS). This course supports the marine license requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). Prerequisites: NS271 and NS 272. Co-requisite: NS293. Rec.3, Cr. 3.

NS293: Electronic Navigation Lab Weekly exercises in the RADAR simulator allow the student to practice and develop skills in interpreting RADAR information and using RADAR for collision avoidance, as well as applying theory taught in NS292. Successful completion of this course results in a USCG Radar Observer’s Certificate. This course supports the marine license requirements to meet the Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW). Co-requisite: NS292. Lab 1, Cr. 1

NS298: Topics in Small Vessel Operations   A capstone course intended to further prepare 200 ton license candidates for positions of responsibility aboard a limited tonnage vessel. This course will expand the student’s knowledge of vessel design, construction, stability, emergency maneuvers and operations. Attention is also given to crew management, regulatory issues, and the variety of decisions that a professional mariner may expect to face. Prerequisite: NS241. Rec. 2, Cr. 2.

NS299 : 200 Ton License Seminar  Course to assist senior license candidates in preparing to write the appropriate USCG license examination. Sample tests will be used, test-taking techniques studied and study guides reviewed. The use of CFRs and other references will be covered. Rec. 2, Cr. 1.